Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Paul's January 2012 Fly of the Month



Mickey Finn

Hook:  Diachi 2220 Size #4 to #10 4X long streamer hook or similar (Mustad 9672).    

Thread:  Black. 

Body:  Flat Silver Tinsel.       Ribbing:  Oval Silver Tinsel.

Wing:  Yellow over red, over yellow buck tail.  

Head:   Black thread.

One of the first fly’s that I ever learned to tie was a Mickey Finn.  One of the easiest flies to tie, and boy does it catch trout on the Housatonic.  Yellow has always been a great streamer color on the Hous.  Rainbows love it.

Begin by applying a thread base across the hook shank.   Cover with thread and lacquer.  Tie in the oval silver tinsel at the hook bend.   Bring your thread forward to the eye.  Tie in the flat silver tinsel.  Wrap it back to the hook bend, then reverse directions and bring it back to the eye.  Tie and cut it off.  Leave enough room to add a wing and form a head.  Next, wrap your ribbing forward to the eye, tie and cut it off.  Option:  Sometimes instead of using flat and oval tinsel, I’ll make my body from silver mylar diamond tubbing.  What is important is to create a slender and even body profile.

Now apply your wing.  First, tie in a small amount of yellow buck tail. It should extend just a little beyond the hook bend.  Make 3-4 thread wraps to secure it. Cut the excess calf tail at an angle to ultimately form a symmetrical head.  Repeat the step with the same amount of red buck tail.  Finally, apply the same amount of yellow buck tail for the top of the wing.  Form a head of black thread.  Tie off and lacquer.  Traditionally this fly has no eyes, but I have painted white eyes with a black center on some of mine.  Many of my streamers I like on the sparse side.  This is one of them. 

Fish it with a “twitch”, slow retrieve, fast retrieve, or a “wet fly” swing.  It’s great in lakes or rivers.  So productive when it came out in the 1930’s, it was once called “The Assassin”.   If you are just learning to tie and fly fish, this is definitely the streamer for you.  Trout, small mouth bass, and large mouth bass will all succumb to this pattern.  If you are a Salt Water fly fisher, this color combination is an old time tradition striper killer. Its still a great salt water fly today. 

This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of  The month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net.

Monday, November 14, 2011

Paul's December 2011 Fly of the Month



Monomoy Sand Eel 


Hook:  Daiichi #2546 stainless steel salt water size 2

Thread:  Olive 6/0 and Chartreuse 3/0.
Eyes:  3/16” nickel dumbbell with 1/8” adhesive eye.
Body:  Pearl flat diamond braid.
Wing:  Chartreuse bucktail with gold Krystal Flash or Flash-a-bou.
This pattern was submitted by former HFFA President Fred Monahan.  Here’s what Fred says about this fly.  “George Ryan, a Cape Cod guide, introduced me to salt water fishing and this Clouser derivative on a trip to Monomy in 1998 where I caught my first Striper on the Monomy Sand Eel.  The fly is very effective when sand eels are present and, as with most Clouser flys, it also works well in fresh water”.  This pattern is an easy tie and extremely effective.  With only a top wing, it also fouls less than most traditional Clousers and fishes deeper. 
Begin, by attaching the dumbbell to the top of the hook 2/5 of the way back from the eye of the hook with olive 6/0 thread.  Use x wraps, figure 8 wraps, and apply head cement to wraps.  Attach adhesive eyes (I like to apply a coating of  epoxy over them after the fly is completed).  Wrap olive thread back from eyes to ¼ of the way past the bend of the hook.  Tie in body braid at the end of olive thread and wrap thread forward beyond eyes.  Wrap body braid forwards over olive thread, over eyes and tie off in front of eyes,  whip finish and cut off live thread.  Attach buck tail to underside of hook between eyes and eye of hook with chartreuse thread.  Attach a few strands of Krystal Flash or Flash-a-bou on each side of bucktail.  Form head, whip finish and apply head cement or epoxy.
This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at www.hffa.net and        www.tightlinesflyfishing.blogspot.com/.  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net.

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Paul's November 2011 Fly of the Month


EZ Eyes Hare Emerger
Hook:  Size 12 to 18 Curved shank emerger or scud hook. 
Tying thread:   Black 8/0 or 6/0.
Trailing shuck:  A small bundle of ginger hackle fibers.
Rib:   Pearl Krystal Flash or narrow Flashabou.
Body:  Hares ear dubbing or synthetic substitues.
Wing:  A thin strip of 2 millimeter thick closed cell white foam for larger flies, or short tag of white cylindrical foam for size 18 flies.

Hackle:   Light ginger.
I love emergers and I especially love emergers on a curved shank hook.  The top part of the fly remains visible in the surface film and the “butt” of the fly extends down below the surface film.  This particular pattern can be used to imitate a variety of caddis and mayflies.  Just size it to the insects on the water.  It’s also a great “attractor” or “search” pattern.  The foam wing helps you to keep visual contact with your fly.
Begin by starting your tying thread 1/3 down the hook shank from the eye.  Extend the thread the rest of the way into the hook shank to the deep bend in the hook.  Tie in a bundle (approximately 6-8 fibers) of light ginger to form the shuck.  These fibers should be half the length of the body.  Tie in a strand of Krystal flash to be used for the rib.  Dub a tapered body half way up the length of the hook.  Tie in your ginger hackle immediately next to the dubbed body.  Next, cut a thin strip of closed cell foam needed to form a loop wing.  The foam is tied in on top of the remaining hook shank.  It is then looped and tied in so that it leans forward over the hook eye and resembles a “cripple” style wing.  It is critical that when tying in the foam wing enough space is left between the dubbed body and the wing to wrap your ginger hackle.  Once the wing is in place, wrap the hackle 3-4 times behind it.  Secure the hackle with your thread.  You can now tie off your thread near the eye of the hook. 
This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of  The month I can be reached at 203 305-3854 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net.

Friday, September 16, 2011

Paul's October 2011 Fly of the Month

CDC Caddis Emerger

Hook:  Daiichi 1120, or TMC 2457, or TMC 2487 #12 to #18 Curved emerger hook.  (I prefer the TMC 2487)
Tying thread: Black, orange, brown, olive, or yellow to match natural.
Tail/trailing shuck:  Tan, yellow or amber z-lon.
Rib:  Copper Wire.
Abdomen: Antron dubbing. Color to match the natural. (Brown, tan, cream, green)
Under Wing:  Dun or amber z-lon.
Over Wing:  Dun or amber CDC.
Antennae: (Optional) Two lemon wood duck fibers.
Thorax:  Peacock hurl.

I love fishing emerger patterns on “curved emerger” hooks.   The fly is visible on the surface and the rear of the fly extends down into the surface film.  The antron dubbing and reflective trilobal fibers make it very translucent.  The z-lon/CDC wing mimics insect movement.  How can trout resist it?  

Begin by wrapping your thread from the hook eye deep into the bend of the hook.  Tie in your z-lon shuck.  Trim it to the length of the hook gap.  Next tie in your copper wire rib.  Dub your antron abdomen approximately ¾ the length of the hook shank.  Make sure you leave enough room to tie in your wing and thorax. Rib it with copper wire.  Tie in your under/over wing.  It should be ½ the length of the hook with the CDC tips at the “edge” of the wing.  Tie in two lemon wood duck fibers for the antennae.  They should sweep back and be slightly longer than the wing.  Tie in a strand or two of Peacock hurl.  Make two or three wraps for the thorax.  Tie off and whip finish fly.  Sometimes I fish this fly by itself, letting it drift and skidder along in the surface film.  Other times I fish it as a trailing fly in tandem with a caddis adult. 

This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at http://www.hffa.net/ .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of
The month I can be reached at 203 305-3854 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net.

Saturday, August 20, 2011

HFFA September 1, 2011 Meeting

HFFA meeting September 1, 2011 7:00PM, to be held at:
St.Paul’s Episcopal Church
65 North Main Street
Wallingford, CT 06492
HFFA members and interested fly fishers, you won’t want to miss this meeting.  This is a free event to all.   It’s being brought to you by the HFFA E Board with the topic of discussion being “isonichias”.  This is an insect that’s on the Hous and the Farmington for most of the “dry fly” season.   The isonichia dun is one of the largest mayflies on our waters.  Learn how to fish it and tie it.  Fly tyers will be on hand to show and tie dun and nymph immitations.   Also learn “dropper” techniques and rigging.  This is definately a presentation that will improve your fish catching ability! 


Both of these "Iso" patterns can be found in the Fly of the Month section of http://www.hffa.net/  .

Paul's September 2011 Fly of the Month



“Skull Head” Deceiver

Hook:  Tiemco 600SP size #2 to #4/0, or salt water hook of preference.  
Thread:  White flymaster+ or color matching upper wing color.
Tail:  6 White saddle hackle tied in deceiver style.
Body:  Pearl body braid (wrapped over the hook shank after the tail is applied).
Lower wing:  White buck tail -- two bunches of buck tail are tied in on each side, slightly angled down toward the hook point, extending almost to the tips of your saddle hackle.  Topped with pearlescent Flash-a-bou, or Polar Flash, or flash material of choice.
Upper Wing:  Chartreuse, or olive, or pink, or color of choice buck tail.  Topped with pearlescent Flash-a-bou, or Polar Flash, or flash material of choice, then topped with peacock or green flash-a-bou. 
Fish Skull:  To match hook size. 

 
I caught a lot of fish using this pattern this past spring.   Similar to a clouser minnow, the weighted “head” of the fly gives it a jigging action.  What’s great about the “fish heads” is that they can be applied to the hook so that the fly fishes hook point down or inverted like a clouser. 

The key to tying this fly is to make sure you leave enough room to apply the “fish skull” at the end of the tying process.  Begin by advancing your thread from the hook eye to the bend of the hook.  Next, tie in your 6 saddle hackle on top of the hook shank “deceiver” style.  The feathers should extend anywhere from 1 ½ to 2 ½ times the length of the hook shank. Next, tie in your pearl body braid near the bend of the hook.  Palmer it forward and tie off leaving approximately ¼ of the hook shank to the eye.  I then coat it with ‘tough as nails’ for added durability.  You can also take time to test that your “fish skull” will fit properly over the eye of the hook.  I usually do this a couple times during the tying process. Next tie in two bunches of white buck tail on each side of the hook shank.  They should be a little shorter than the tail, and slightly angled down.  Top the lower wing/tail with pearlescent Flash-a-bou or Polar Flash.  It should extend to the tip of the tail.  Next, tie in your upper wing (chartreuse, olive, or color of choice).  It should also extend to the tip of the tail.  Top with more pearlescent Flash-a-bou.  Finally top it with peacock or dark green Flash-a-bou.  You’re now ready to apply your “fish skull”.  Tie off your thread.  Before applying the “fish skull” to the hook shank, coat the contact area with head cement or adhesive of choice.  Follow the “fish skull” directions.  Depending upon how you affix it to the hook shank,  the fly will either fish with the hook point down, as any traditional fly would, or you can apply it to the hook shank so your fly will fish inverted just as a traditional clouser would.  If you tied the fly properly, the eye of the hook will extend just beyond the fish skull.  Re-apply and make a number of wraps with your thread just before the hook eye, then tie it off again.  Apply head cement.  This is to further ensure that the “fish skull” will stay permanently affixed to the hook.  (I’ve never had one loosen up on me yet, but this is the manufacturer’s recommended tying method.)  I don’t know if this fly out fishes clousers, but they sure work.  Only drawback is they aren’t cheap. 

This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen's Associaton website at http://www.hffa.net/ .  

Monday, June 6, 2011

Stripers reproducing in the Housatonic?




Hi All, a few nights ago, Internet Fishing star Bear Cochrane, Ralph "pass the canolis" Biase, and Drew Farrell fished the Hous in the Derby/Shelton area.  Some of the fish we landed were very small juveniles.  Some very compelling evidence that stripers are reproducing in the Housatonic River.  Tight Lines.   Paul

Friday, May 20, 2011

Paul's June 2011 Fly of the Month





Paul’s Buck Tail Baitfish

Hook:  Mustad 34007 size 1 and 1/0, or salt water hook of preference, sizes #1 and #1/0.  
Thread:  White flymaster+ or color matching upper wing color.
Tail/lower wing:  White buck tail.  The first and longest bunch of buck tail is tied in on top of the hook shank, then wrapped with body braid.  Two slightly shorted bunches of buck tail are tied in on each side slightly angled down toward the hook point.  Topped with pearlescent Flash-a-bou, or Polar Flash, or flash material of choice.
Body:  Pearl body braid (wrapped over the hook shank after the tail is applied).
Upper Wing:  Chartreuse, olive or "root beer" buck tail.  Topped with a darker Flash-a-bou, Polar Flash, or Flash material of choice.  When I tie this fly in Chartreuse I use a chartreuse colored flash. 
Eyes:  3-D Molded Eyes, covered with epoxy.

There are probably 100’s of variations of this fly out there.  Here’s my version of it.  Perhaps the best way to describe this fly is a “deceiver without the feathers”.  Although it has less movement than a deceiver, it fouls infrequently and seems to be just as productive.  It’s super easy to tie and boy does it catch fish.   Just a great all round’ bait imitation.   Tie it sparsely in “root beer” and you have an excellent sand eel pattern.   Strip it back at various speeds and make sure you “dead drift” it in the current as well.

Begin by advancing your thread from the hook eye to the bend of the hook.  Next, tie in a small bunch of buck tail on top of the hook shank.  It should extend beyond the bend anywhere from 1 ½ to 2 ½ times the length of the hook shank. When I tie it in I lay the buck tail along the top of the hook shank and cover it with thread.  This provides you with a very even base for the rest of the fly.  Next, tie in your pearl body braid near the bend of the hook.  Palmer it forward and tie off just before the eye.  I then coat it with ‘tough as nails’ for added durability.  I also apply head or ‘flex’ cement at numerous stages in the construction of the fly.  Next tie in two bunches of white buck tail on each side of the hook shank.  They should be a little shorter than the tail, and slightly angled down.  Top the lower wing/tail with pearlescent Flash-a-bou or Polar Flash.  It should be tied in near the eye and extend to the tip of the tail.  Next, tie in your upper wing (chartreuse, olive, or root beer).  It should extend from the eye of the hook to the tip of the tail.  Top this with darker Flash-a-bou, Polar Flash, or flash material of choice.  Apply 3-D eyes.  Finally, epoxy the eyes and head of the fly.

This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of
The month I can be reached at 203 305-3854 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net.





Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Stripers, Housatonic River Mouth 4/25/11


Hi All, Fished the mouth of the Housatonic last night with friends Drew Farrel and Jeff Purcell.  The fish were there and Drew had a very hot hand.  We were later joined by Glen Elia.  A great night to be out there.  Lots of "near the surface" action.   Tight lines.   Paul

Sunday, April 24, 2011

A Rainy Hous-Stock Again !


Hi All......despite some very trying conditions a group of fly fishermen from CT and RI gathered and fished at the mouth of the Hous.......it just had to rain at an event called Hous-Stock......third year in a row we held this event and third year in a row it rained.........Fire Marshall Tim Smith won the rod with a 22" striper.........I just want to thank everyone for their support and help today .......its very much appreciated....special thanks to Robert Montori and Bruce Pomeroy for helping with the raffle.....Gary Tyler for his flies and trucking the grill and tables down to Short Beach........thanks to Mike Sivek and  "Internet Fishing Star" Bear Cochrane for donating flies......Mike Harrington for his donation of a really great fly wallet, and Jeff Purcell for an awesome tying bench which he made, nicest one I've ever seen..............I didn't have much time to talk to many of you today, but hope to fish with as many of you as I can in the coming season.......it's the reason why I started this event......to get people together, meet new friends, and enjoy the great resource that the river is.......again, I just wish mother nature had co-operated with us ........tight lines......... Paul

Friday, April 22, 2011

Paul's May 2011 Fly of the Month

Phil’s Early Black Stone (Taeniopterux)

Hook:  Tiemco 100 or 102 Y – or equivalent dry fly hook, size #12, 14, 18   
Thread:  Black  
Body:  Black poly yarn.
Wing:  Grey poly yarn.   (you might also want to add some gray CDC to the wing.  The movement and  bubbles give it a life like effect)                                                                                            
Hackle:  Black or gray hen, one wrap.

I’ve seen a lot of “Early Black Stone Fly” patterns but I really like the one that my friend Phil Sheffield ties.  Most others are more complex and take a lot longer to tie than this one.  It’s an easy tie and it’s just as productive.  These little stone flies start hatching sometimes as early as January.  I’ve witnessed fantastic hatches in March here in Connecticut.   Perhaps one of the best of Early Black Stone hatches in CT occurs on the Mianus River.  I know that Phil has had great success with this pattern on the Yantic River. 

These bugs skidder, flutter, and dart around the water.  That’s exactly what you want to do when fishing it.  Give it a strip or two while its floating, and don’t be afraid at the end of your drift to pull it under water.  Many times trout will hit it as it goes subsurface.   These bugs come off around mid-day as the water heats up.  Before that you want to fish a little black stone fly nymph imitation. 

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of the month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Houstock April 23, 2011 Sponsered by the HFFA

A Day of Peace, Love, & Fly Fishing Bliss
 Date:  Saturday April 23, 2011
**this date has been selected so that those who wish the fly fish at the mouth of the Housatonic can do so from approximately 8:00 a.m. until noon.
We will be giving away a rod for the largest fish caught.
Time:  12 noon
Place:  Stratford CT Short Beach under
the Main Pavilion #1
Come picnic with us on the beach !
Hot Dogs, Burgers, and other eats will be served.
We will be having a raffle that will include at least one rod and reel !
This event is free to all HFFA, CT/RI, & MIANUS/TU   $5 for all others.
Please RSVP to Paul Dinice at pdinice@snet.net or if you don’t have an email address call at
203 305-3850 so that we can get a head count for this event.
Hi All, Houstock is happening a few weeks earlier this year…..in fact its going to be held during prime striper migration…..so I’m hoping the fishing is much improved from last year and without lightening>>>>>>was that unbelievable ?….  ALL I ASK IS PLEASE LET ME KNOW YOUR GOING TO BE THERE !!!….You must be signed up to be eligible to win the rod for catching the biggest fish…. ..Time slot for this contest is 8:00 a.m. to 12 Noon….You must catch the fish ON A FLY…similar to the Barry Adams Tourney you will measure the length and girth of the fish in case of a tie….so bring your tape measures….and it must be witnessed by another Houstock Participant…..a photo would be nice too but not required……HFFA Representatives will be there for assistance……..I need your name email address and phone number…..only those people that sign up will be eligible to win the rod……….So let me know !!!…..EMAIL ME…AT pdinice@snet.net   ..WITH YOUR NAME, EMAIL, AND PHONE NUMBER!!!…lots of food and eats starting around 12 noon……..we will also be raffling off a salt water rod and reel……….so bring your tie dyed shirts, Greatful Dead CD’s……..and party with us……….Paul  
as the event approaches I will be furnishing directions and more particulars ……..Paul  ps…….CT/RI MEMBER PETER JACKSON HAS ALREADY THROWN DOWN THE GAUNTLET MAINTAINING THAT HE’LL BE WINNING THE ROD TWO YEARS IN A ROW……

Paul's April 2011 Fly of the Month

Sulfur Soft Hackle

Hook:  Size 14 to 18 dry fly hook.  Tying thread:   Yellow or orange.
Tail:   Light dun hen hackle fibers.
Abdomen:  Yellow rabbit dubbing such as Hare’s ear plus.
Rib:   Fine gold wire.
Thorax:  Orange Hare’s ear plus.
Hackle:  Light dun hen hackle.

Sulfur hatches (Ephemerella dorothia and smaller Epeorus vitreus) are major hatches on the Housatonic and Farmington Rivers.  A lot of anglers don’t even bother to fish wet flies but I find them a very effective way to catch trout.  When fishing the fly, try presenting it so that it starts to rise just as it reaches a good lie – where you believe the fish to be holding (a technique known as the Leisenring lift).   Another technique I use when fishing wet flies is to fish them directly downstream (straight drift technique).   You’ll be amazed at how many fish will take your wet fly when it’s dancing down stream from you on or near the surface of the water.  Occasionally give your line a little twitch, or let some additional line out.

Sometimes it’s hard to identify what stage the insect is in when trout take them.  Or they can be taking them at different stages and at random.  All the more reason to fish two (2) flies.  I love fishing two flies during a sulfur hatch.  I’ll fish a sulfur dry or floating emerger and trail the sulfur soft hackle 8 to 12 inches behind it.  The first fly even acts as a strike indicator for the soft hackle.

I love the fact that this pattern has orange in it.  All the sulfur patterns that I have with orange out produce the ones that don’t.

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of the month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .  This pattern can also be viewed at www.hffa.net .

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Bear's Bunker

This pattern is just magical when it comes to catching stripers.  We constantly get asked "What fly are you using?" and "how do you tie a Bear's Bunker?"  Well here it is.

Bear’s Bunker

Hook – Mustad #34007 or salt water hook of preference, sizes #2 to #5/0. 
             (I like using Gamakatsu B10S or Tiemco 600 SP)
Thread – Clear monofilament.   
Body – Flash n’ Slinky.
Wing – Flash n’ Slinky (Optional - add flash material of choice,
             angel hair, etc.) 
Eyes – 3D molded eyes or stick on eyes.       
Epoxy  – Over eyes and head of the fly.

This fly is actually an improved and advanced version of what was previously known as “Bear’s Big Yak Attack”.  There was a time when I would never tie or fish flies comprised primarily of artificial materials.  I preferred to fish large deceiver type “grocery flies”.  Some of the newer materials now available have changed my mind.   These “new” materials, with their iridescent silhouette, catch fish like crazy.  This pattern is so versatile it can imitate the complete range of bait fish, from silversides, to peanut bunker, to bay anchovies.   This is an easy fly to tie.  It just takes a little practice.  Each one is like your own personal little sculpture and will reflect your tying “style”.  

Begin by tying in a length of flash n’ slinky approximately 1 ½ to 2 times the hook shank length at the bend of the hook.  (Be sure to roll the material in your fingers and make sure the fibers are tapered and uneven, or your fly will be comprised of “straight cut” sections of material.)  Tie it in at the bend of the hook.  The material tends to spin.  Hold it in place until it’s secured.   Next, invert your fly in the vice.  Tie in a length of material on the bottom of the hook shank.  It should be tied in at a 45 degree angle, approximately 2/3 the length of the tail.  When applying it must be split to have equal portions on each side of the hook bend.  Keep your hook inverted.  Next, tie in your belly, 2-3 segments, again at a 45 degree angle.  Length should extend from the hook shank to the hook point.  Invert your fly back to the conventional tying position.  At this point you might want to coat the hook shank with flex-cement for durability.   Tie in your sides to the fly deceiver style along the hook shank.   The sides should extend a little past the bend of the hook.   Add your first layer of wing material.  I usually tie the belly of the fly in white, and use a darker color for the wing.   It should extend slightly past the tail of the fly.  Apply a second layer of wing material, same length.  When applying the wing you can add additional flash material if you so desire.  I sometimes use angel hair.  Finally, add your last segment of material on top of the wing, approximately ½ the length of the wing.   Apply 3D molded eyes.  Epoxy eyes and the head of the fly.  Color combinations that produce are olive and white, orange and white, black and white, all black (killer at night), and all white in small sizes (this is a great Albie Fly!)  An instructional video on this fly can be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rE8G-RilwUo .

        If you have any questions about this fly e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net.

Friday, March 11, 2011

Paul's March 2011 Fly of the Month

The Black Leach
(also tied in Olive)

Hook:  Size #10  Mustad 9672
Thread:  Black.
Tail:  Black or olive rabbit zonker strip and 4-6 strands of rainbow or pearl
Krystal flash.
Body:  Black or olive leech yarn (mohair).
Weight:   Lead wraps, on only first third of the body

A few years back fly fishing friend John Springer gave me a few “Leaches” to try on my next fly fishing excursion.   I haven’t stopped using them since.  It is a “must have fly” in my box.  The fly was developed by John’s friend Ed Ostapczuk.  Although I’ve fished it almost exclusively in river and streams, Ed says it’s also a great “still water” pattern.  The fly is weighted.  Lead is only applied to the first half - to first third of the fly.  The action that is created is similar to a lead head jig.  When the fly is stripped through the water it undulates.  At each pause it “dives” towards the bottom.  This action is deadly.  I’ve also had great success dead drifting and nymphing with it.  I love fishing it with my 4wt and a 10’ sink tip line. 

You can read how Ed developed “The Black Leach” in the “Stories” section of the HFFA website at http://www.hffa.net/ .   Some great photos on how to tie it as well. 

Welcome to Paul's World of Fly Fishing

Hi All, Welcome to my blog site.  It's dedicated to Fly Tying, Fly Fishing, and most of all, friends who join me in this endeavor.  I feel very lucky and blessed to passionately enjoy the "quiet sport".  I feel equally lucky to live in CT, a state with tremendous oppurtunities to fish fresh and salt water.  I'm also in proximity to great fishing in NY, RI and MA, and in particular Cape Cod.  I hope this site will provide information on great fishing spots, fly patterns, and experiences.  Hope to see you at the tying bench or out on the water.   "Tight Lines"   Paul D