Thursday, December 26, 2013

Paul's January 2014 Fly of the Month

Chuck's Sculpin




 
Hook:  Tiemco 9395 or comparable streamer hook Size #2-10

Tying thread:   A thick thread such as Danville Flymaster Plus or Gudebrod Super G.

Weight:   Medium lead wire.

Body:  Beige or Off White Aunt Lydia’s Antron Rug Yarn. 

Gills:  Chopped red antron spiky dubbing

Underwing:  Krystal Flash to match wing color

Wing:  Olive Rabbit Zonker Strip.  (Also tie these in Black, Brown, and Natrual).

Head:  Olive spun deer hair clipped to shape.

First of all if you fish the Housatonic and you don’t have a sculpin pattern in your fly box your really missing something.  This pattern will catch you a ton of trout.  Smallies just devour them.  There are a lot of other exotic sculpin patterns out there, but this one is so much easier to tie and just as effective.  When your fishing this fly please remember that sculpins tend to live and feed on the bottom of the river.  Unlike trout, they do not have stabilizing air bladders.  I think it’s really important to add weight to this fly.  Make sure that when you lead wrap the hook shank you leave enough room to spin your deer hair head.  You may also want to use a sink tip or full sink line.  Scuplins are darters so a short pulsing retrieve strip is the technique to use.  Also, don’t be afraid to let your fly sit in the current at times.

Begin by laying a base of thread on your hook shank.  Wrap the hook shank with lead, cover with thread wraps and coat with “tough as nails”.  Remember to leave enough room for the spun deer head.  Tie in your body yarn.  Wrap your yarn forward and tie it off even with the lead wraps.  Dub your “red gills” with a few thread wraps.  A spiky antron dubbing is perfect for this.  A red ice dub can also be used.  Next tie in 5-6 strands of Krystal Flash.  They should extend just slightly beyond the bend of the hook.  Next tie in your zonker wing.  You may want to apply some head cement for extra durability.  Begin your deer head by applying a clump of deer hair on each side of the hook shank to form the shoulders of the fly.  You are not going to spin these first two clumps of deer hair.  You are going to torque down on them to make the butt end of the hairs flair up and out.  Next, spin clumps of deer hair around the hook shank.  Tie off your thread and trim the deer hair to shape.  Dab head cement on the deer head hair.  Your fly is now ready to be fished.  One final comment on this fly or any similar patterns where spinning deer hair is required,  don’t be intimidated by it.  It’s no more difficult to master “deer hair spinning” than any other fly tying technique.

This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at  www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .





Saturday, December 21, 2013

HFFA Fly Tying

For more than 20 years I've been teaching Salt Water Fly Tying for the Housatonic Fly Fishermen's Association.  Cost of the course (5 nights) is $5.  That's a Dollar a class, includes all materials and hooks, and you'll go home with 2-3 flies per class.  It's so enjoyable to tie a fly mid-winter, take it out of your box in the spring or summer, then catch a striper on it.  Let's you dream about better fishing days and warmer weather.  I also continue to learn from everyone I tie with, no matter how experienced they are.  Thank you to all those friends who shared their knowledge, laughter, and experiences with me. 


 

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Paul's December 2013 Fly of the Month

Angry Jake




Hook:  Standard Nymph, size 10 to 20. 

Thread:  Black (I sometimes use orange).     Weight:  Lead wraps.

Abdomen/Body: Turkey Tail Feathers.

Tail:  Turkey tail feather fibers.         Rib: Fine copper or red wire.

Thorax:  Ice Peacock Dubbing.

Wing Case:  Dark/Black (or holographic) nymph skin coated with epoxy.

Legs:  Partridge.                      Bead: (optional) Gold or Copper.

This is the Farmington River’s version of the Pheasant Tail nymph.  It’s much darker than a PT nymph.  Those that fish the Angry Jake instead of the PT nymph swear by it.   This is my version of it. 

Begin by placing your bead on the hook then insert in vice.  Add a layer of thread from behind the bead to the bend of the hook.  Add wraps of lead approximately 1/3rd the length of the hook shank behind the bead.  Cover with thread then give it a coat of Hard as Nails.  Tie in 3-5 strands of Turkey Tail feathers at the bend of the hook.  Leave the tag end of the turkey feathers. Tie in additional turkey fibers if needed for the Abdomen.  Tie in red copper ribbing.   Palmer the turkey tail forward to create your abdomen.  Counter wrap the abdomen with red copper wire.  Tie in your nymph case.  Dub your thorax with peacock dubbing.  Tie in your legs on each side of the fly.  Bring your wing case over the thorax and tie it off.  The fly is finished.  I like to epoxy the wing case to give the nymph a little extra flash.

This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net.

 

Friday, October 18, 2013

Paul's November 2013 Fly of the Month

Epoxy Back Nymph
 

Hook:  Daiichi 1550 or nymph hook of choice Size #14-#20. 
Tying thread:   Uni 8/0 in black, brown, or olive.
Bead:  Copper colored bead.
Tail:   Brown hen neck fibers.
Abdomen:  Black, brown, or olive Ice Dub over which is palmered a color matching goose or turkey biot.
Rib:   Fine red wire.
Wing Case:  Pearl mylar tinsel or ribbon.
Thorax:  Black, brown, or olive Ice Dub.
Legs:  Brown hen neck fibers.
Top of nymph:  Coated with 5 minute epoxy or U.V. resin.
 
This is one of my top 6 go to nymphs on the Housatonic and the Farmington.  
With a tungsten bead and an epoxy back, this nymph gets down deep in a hurry.  I’ve had great success with it in all three colors (black, brown, & olive).  When I tie it in olive, I usually tie it in smaller sizes, sometimes using it as a dropper behind a large dry fly. 
 
Start the thread at the eye.  Wrap down the hook to the hook bend.  Tie in your hen tail fibers.  Next, tie in your red wire to be used for your ribbing.  Now tie in your turkey or goose biot by the pointy tip.  Please note that one side (raised edge) of the biot will give you a more segmented look once it’s wrapped up the hook shank.  Dub the abdomen with Ice Dub.  It should have a very slim profile.  Next, get your hackle pliers and palmer the biot over the dubbed abdomen.  Leave a little space between the wraps.  This adds to the visual segmentation of the abdomen.  When I tie this nymph in a size #20 I usually forgo the Ice Dub. Because the fly is so small I form the abdomen by wrapping the biot over itself.  Once the abdomen is formed, tie and cut off the biot.  Now counter wrap the red wire up the abdomen.  Tie and cut it off.  Next tie in a thin piece of mylar tinsel or ribbon for a wing case.  Dub your thorax with Ice Dub.  Tie in your legs of hen neck fibers on each side of the nymph, just behind the bead.  Bring your pearl tinsel forward and tie it off at the bead.
 
Finally, give the top of the wing case a coat of U.V. resin or 5 minute epoxy. 
 
If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month, I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .  This pattern can also be viewed at www.hffa.net .

Sunday, September 15, 2013

Paul's October 2013 Fly of the Month

Harrington's Deep Rip Deceiver a.k.a. The HDRD



Hook:  Gamakatsu#55015 in size #5/0.
Thread:  White flymaster.
Tail:  Four (4) to six (6) big schlappen hackles tied deceiver style.  Also, flash-a
          bou mylar tinsel of choice.
Body:  White/pearl crystal chenille. (Optional lead wraps under the chenille.)  (Another option, add a rattle on the hook shank.)
Throat:  White buck tail.
Wing:  Chartreuse, purple, or blue buck tail over white buck tail.
Lateral line:  Holographic mylar tinsel.
Eyes:  Oversized molded stick-on eyes.  Eyes are glued on then epoxied over.
 
This is a big fly!  8” to 10” long.  It is a variation on what’s known as a “Grocery Deceiver”.  It delivers.  My friend Mike Harrington has perfected this pattern.  He uses this fly with deep sinking lines on the Branford Rips.  Use the HDRD when you want to use a big fly to catch a big fish.  It’s a great pattern anywhere, anytime, especially for those striper monsters lurking in the deep.
This pattern calls for one of the biggest hooks you’ve ever tied on.  If you can’t find the Gamakatsu hook, tie it on a similar long shank “bait” hook available at most tackle stores. Begin by starting your thread at the eye of the hook and wrapping back to the bend.  If you want to really make this fly sink, add some lead wraps to the shank.  Make sure you “thread over” the lead, then cement or “hard nail” the wraps. 
 
Next tie in your schlappen hackles so that they extend 5” to 7” beyond the bend of the hook.  The hackles are tied in at the stiff base of the feather.  This makes it much more difficult to “foul” around the hook when it’s fished.   Tie in some strands of mylar flash-a-bou to the flank the tail.  Next tie in your crystal chenille, then palmer it half way up the hook shank.  Tie and clip it off.
The wing of the fly is going to consist of 2-3 clumps of buck tail.  Try to use buck tail that has a long length to it.  You want to profile of the fly to be as large as possible.  You are going to use a darker buck tail (color of your choice) for your topping. The key element to tying this fly, and how it differs from other deceivers, is the technique of “hy-tying” your buck tail wing onto the shank of the hook.  Tie the first wing clump of white buck tail on the top of the hook shank.  Once it’s affixed to the hook, wrap your thread at least 6-8 times around the buck tail so that it protrudes at approximately a 45 degree angle to the hook shank.  Now tie in a similar size clump of white buck tail for your matching throat.  Again, you are going to “hy-tie” it at a 45 degree angle to the hook shank.  Repeat this process one or two other times along the hook shank to the eye. 
 
Remember, for the last clump of the wing buck tail, you’re going to use a darker color to mimic the darker back of a bait fish.  Now tie in a small amount of white buck tail on each side of the fly, parallel to the hook shank to fill in the body.  Next, tie in your holographic tinsel to serve as the lateral line.  Tie off and whip finish fly.  Affix your 3D molded eyes to the fly, then epoxy or use a “light” resin over the eyes and nose of the fly for added durability.  Good luck.  You just might catch the “fish of a life time” with this one.
 
This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at  www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month, I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Paul's September 2013 Fly of the Month

Pink Squirrel Nymph
 


Hook:  Size 10 to 16 Curved Scud (Mustad 3906B) or nymph hook of choice.    
Tying thread:   Black.
Bead:   Gold.
Tail:  Rainbow Krystal Flash, 2-3 strands.
Abdomen:  Blend of Olive Ice Dub, burnt Orange Antron, & chopped fox squirrel.
Weight (Optional):  Wraps of .015 lead.
Rib (optional):  Red Ultra wire, x-small.
Thorax:   Pink Ice Dub.


This fly was developed by John Bethke of Westby, Wisconsin.  His original recipe calls for a pink hot spot collar of Coral Pink Chenille.  I prefer to use Pink Ice Dub.  It’s spikier and a little ‘brighter’.  This fly is really a variation of the traditional “Hare’s Ear”.  Many have called this a great cold weather or winter nymph.   I like to use it anytime through out the season.  It’s a great attractor pattern.

Begin by placing a gold bead on your hook.  Lay a base of thread from the hook curve to the bead head.  Return your thread to the bend of the hook and add lead wraps if so desired.  Don’t forget to “thread over” and cement your lead wraps.  Next tie in 2-3 strands of Rainbow Krystal Flash for your tail.  The length of the tail should be 1 hook gap.  Next, tie in your ribbing of Red Ultra Wire.   Blend and/or mix your dubbing for the Abdomen.  Dub a tapered body leaving enough room for your pink collar.  Rib the body of the fly and tie off your rib wire.  Dub a collar/thorax of Pink Ice Dub.  Tie off and cement the thread/knot of your fly.

This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at  www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Sometimes the most memorable fish are the ones that got away !


A few weeks ago I was fortunate enough to fish the Farmington River with my friend Jeff.  We were there in the early morning hours and like many summer mornings, there was a fine mist hovering over the water.  Not many fish were rising at that time of day.  Jeff managed to hook into a really nice fish on a brown mayfly emerger.  He didn’t land it but it sure did bend his rod.  Sometimes the most memorable fish are the ones that got away.

Sunday, May 19, 2013

Paul's June 2013 Fly of the Month

Glowing Clouser



Hook:  Mustad 34077 or similar.  I tie almost all my glowing clousers on Size #1 hooks.

Thread:  3/0 chartreuse.

Eyes:  Dumbbell eyes of choice

Tail:  Glow in the Dark Pearl Flash-a-bou, approximately the length of the hook shank.

Body:  Orange chenille.

Wing:  A few fibers of orange buck tail, over which is a chartreuse buck tail.

This is one of my “super-secret” fly patterns for salt water.  You know every fly has its “day”.  Some work magically at times, and at other times never hook a fish.  I can only tell you that more times than not I’ve caught a lot of fish on this fly, and I’ve caught some very big fish with it.  With these colors the fish certainly aren’t going to miss seeing it.  If it ain’t Chartreuse it ain’t no use !”  Thanks to friends Mike Harrington and Ron Caulfield for turning me on to this color combination years ago.  I love orange in all the flies I fish.  This fly has performed magnificently on Cape Cod.

Begin by tying on your dumbbell eyes as you would a traditional clouser.   Leave enough room between the eyes and hook eye to tie in your wing.    Next advance your thread to the bend in the hook.  Tie in your “Glow in the Dark” Pearl Flash-a-bou.  8-12 strands the length of the hook shank is good.  Next tie in your orange chenille.  Advance the thread so that it is behind the eyes.  Palmer the chenille forward, tie and clip it off.  Advance the thread in front of the eyes and tie in your wing.  Tie off the fly and seal your thread wraps with head cement or epoxy.

This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net.


 

Monday, April 22, 2013

Paul's May 2013 Fly of the Month

Picket Pin

Hook:  Mustad #9671 or #9672  Size #8-10   
Thread:  Black or olive.
Tail:  Brown hackle fibers
Body:  Peacock herl.
Hackle: Brown hen or saddle
Rib:  Fine oval gold tinsel, or gold wire counter wrapped to reinforce palmered body.
Wing:  Grey squirrel tail.
Head:  Peacock herl.
This is a very old fashioned and classic fly.  I don’t really know what it imitates but I’ve caught trout, small mouths, and sun fish with it.  I’ve nymphed it in rivers and fished it as a streamer in larger sizes.  I’ve twitched it through ponds and hooked a lot of sun fish.   I began tying it many years ago because the tying supplies I had were limited.  Fortunately I had all the materials to tie this one. This is also a great wet fly imitation for Alders on the Hous.
 
If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of the month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .  It can also be viewed at www.hffa.net .

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Paul's April 2013 Fly of the Montjh

Trout Bane
 

Photo courtesy of Johnny Utah
 

Hook:  Daiichi 1550 Size #16-24.  Tying thread:   Uni 8/0 Light Cahill.
Tail:   Pheasant tail fibers.
Abdomen:  Thread with pheasant tail fibers tied in on top.
Rib:   Thread.
Thorax:  Light yellow U.V. Ice Dub.
Legs:  Pheasant tail fibers.
Top of nymph:  Coated with 5 minute epoxy or U.V. resin.
This fly is a great variation of a pheasant tail.  It was developed by an innovative fly tyer from New Jersey named Johnny Utah.   Thanks to Johnny for his help and generosity with this Fly of the Month.  Photo also courtesy of Johnny.  His website can be accessed at www.utahsflycorner.com .  There are some great fly patterns there!!! 
The Trout Bane is simple to tie, very effective, and extremely durable.  Start the thread at the eye.  Wrap down the hook to form a tapered nymph body/abdomen.  Tie in your tail of pheasant fibers with two wraps of thread.  For larger flies use 6-8 fibers, smaller ones 3-4.  The tail should be half a hook shank length.  The tag ends of the fibers will become your abdomen top, wing case, and legs.  Pick up your fibers and advance your thread.  Lay your fibers down and take two more thread wraps over them.  Continue doing this for ¾ of the hook shank.  This will create a segmented abdomen on your fly.  Bind your pheasant tail fibers back and dub your thorax of UV dubbing.   Bring the pheasant tail fibers forward to create your wing case.  Take a couple tight wraps to bind the fibers down.  Sweep the fibers behind and under the fly to form the legs.  As with a traditional pheasant tail, make sure you split the legs equally on each side of the fly.  Trim your legs to length.  Give the top of the nymph a coat of U.V. resin or 5 minute epoxy. 
If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of the month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .  This pattern can also be viewed at www.hffa.net .  Below is a video from Jonny Utah on how to tie the Trout Bane.
 


Thursday, February 28, 2013

Paul's March 2013 Fly of the Month

Silver Streak





Hook:  Size #18-#22 TMC 2487.         Thread:  White or Olive.

Bead:  (Optional) Small gold, copper, or silver.  Rib:  Fine blue or chartreuse wire.

Tail:  Dun hen fibers

Abdomen:  Holographic Tinsel, Silver or Pearl (I prefer using pearl).

Thorax:  Holographic white, or chartreuse, or olive ice dubbing.

Legs/Hackle:  Dun hen fibers.

This fly was developed by Mr. Larry Kingrey.  I started using this fly because of the success I had with what I call it’s larger and similar sister “The Lightening Bug”.   That fly is also tied with silver or pearl mylar.  Neither fly looks like a natural bug but boy are they productive.  I usually fish the Lightening Bug during or before sulphur hatches, and the Silver Streak before or during olive hatches. 

To tie this fly begin by wrapping your thread from the eye (or bead) down into the bend of the hook.  Tie in your tail of dun hen fibers.  Next, tie in your wire rib.  Tie in your silver or pearl tinsel and advance your thread.  Wrap your tinsel forward to create your abdomen.  Leave enough room for your thorax and tie it off.  The tag end of your tinsel will be used as your wing case.  Rib your abdomen with the wire.   Tie and cut it off.  Dub your thorax with ice dub.  Tie in dun hackle fibers on both sides of the nymph for your legs.  Take the tinsel tag ends and fold it forward over your thorax for your wing case.  Tie off the fly and add a drop of head cement.

This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of the month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net.

 





Sunday, January 27, 2013

Paul's February 2013 Fly of the Month

Mayfly Cripple
Hook:  Tiemco TMC 100 or hook of choice, sizes 12 to 20.    
Thread:  Olive thread 8/0. 
Tail:  Brown or Amber Z-lon or Pheasant Tail Fibers.   
Rib:  Fine copper wire.  
Abdomen:  Pheasant Tail Fibers.
Thorax:  Olive or Chartreuse Superfine dubbing.  
Wing:   Deer hair or natural CDC feather.
Hackle:  Medium Dun dry fly hackle.

 
I don’t know if trout eat this fly because they think it’s actually crippled and easy prey.  Maybe it’s the pattern’s low profile in the surface film.  I just know it’s been working for me the past 30 years.  I also love using hot colors when I tie it.  I’ll use Chartreuse dubbing or a hot orange wing. 

 
Begin by applying a thread base across the hook shank.   Tie on your Z-lon or Pheasant Tail Fibers for your tail.  Next, tie in your fine copper wire for a rib.  Next, tie in more fibers for your abdomen.  Tie them in and wrap them forward similar to tying a Pheasant tail nymph.   Now rib the abdomen with fine copper wire.  Dub your thorax with Superfine Dubbing.  I love using Chartreuse regardless of the color of the natural on the water.  Next, tie in your CDC or Deer hair wing.  I tend to use a Deer hair wing for large imitations, CDC for medium and small flies.  When you tie the wing in, the Deer hair or CDC tips extend over the hook eye.  Tie the wing in just before the eye.  Next, tie in an undersized hackle feather.  Take only two (2) or three (3) wraps.  Remember, you want to make sure this fly has a “low” profile and is suspended in the surface film.
 
I’ve said time and time again over the years, that when your fishing the CT TMA’s, you often have to use a fly that’s different than the rest.  Fish get pounded constantly by fishermen and learn not to bite traditional patterns.  When there is a hatch of a particular insect over a few weeks, this is one of the patterns that offers something different to weary trout.

 
This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net.
 

HFFA Fly Fishing Expo March 9, 2013

MARCH 9, 2013 TIME 10:00 AM TO 4:00 PM

****** $1 Donation******

Where:  St. Paul’s Episcopal Church
65 N. Main St.,  WALLINGFORD, CT.
(Go to ww.hffa.net  for directions)
FLY FISHING & TYING ACTIVITIES

 Salt Water Tying Class 
10:30 a.m. start time.  Learn to tie 2 Salt water flies.  Bear’s Bunker, & Paul’s Bucktail Bait Fish.  Cost is $1.  All materials and hooks provided.  Seating is limited contact Paul at the # or email below.

HFFA Members will be on-hand to tie many of the best patterns used on the upper and lower Hous.  Your welcome to bring your vice and tie with them.

 
FLY TYING DEMONSTRATIONS !

 TYING MATERIALS PROVIDED FREE !

TIE YOUR FIRST SALT OR FRESH WATER FLY !

TIE THAT FLY PATTERN YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO LEARN !
 

SOME OF THE BEST TYERS AND FISHERMEN IN THE STATE WILL BE IN ATTENDANCE TO ANSWER ANY ?’S YOU MIGHT HAVE !

For more info call Paul Dinice at 203 305-3850 or email at pdinice@snet.net .

Bring your old gear to sell and swap
 
VENDORS, GUIDES & HOUSATONIC FLY FISHING EXPERTS   
There will be a lot of unique materials offered by vendors at the Expo that aren’t normally available anywhere else !