Saturday, November 19, 2016

Paul's December 2016 Fly of the Month

Marts CdL Hen Caddis Emerger






Hook:  Diiachi 1180 Size#16
Tying thread:   Dark Grey or Brown 8/0 Uni Thread.
Body:  Tan Superfine Dubbing.
Underwing:  Cul de Leon rooster barbs, dark pardo (optional).
Flatwing:  Cul de Leon hen neck hackle, speckled brown.
Hackle 1:  CDC natural Grey.
Hackle 2:  Cul de Leon hen neck hackle, speckled brown.
The past few years I have “re-discovered” fishing wet flies.  I started out fishing them a lot because they were easy to tie.  Then I kind of got away from them during my fly fishing journey.  Glad I’m back to using them.  Although this particular fly is characterized as an emerger, I look at it more as a wet fly fished in the surface film.  This fly was invented by a gentleman named Martin Westbeek.  It’s the hackle materials that make this fly “come to life”.  I’ve had some pretty successful days with it. 
I wouldn’t call this an easy tie, but it’s well worth the effort.  To begin tying this fly start your thread behind hook eye and wrap down to the point on the hook shank even with barb of the hook.   Next, dub a thin tapered body, leaving the last 1/3rd of the hook shank (behind the eye) without any dubbing.   This will be the base for your wing and hackle materials.  If you like, tie in a few rooster CdL feather fibers as your underwing.  You are now going to prepare your flatwing.  Take a hen neck hackle and stroke enough fibers in the opposite direction to form a wing.  Hold the fibers in place and lash it down on the  hook shank.  The ‘flatwing’ should extend beyond the hook shank approximately 1/3rd the hook shank.  Cut off the tip of the feather and the ‘butt’ end after the tie down point.  Form an even base behind the hook eye for your hackles.  Next, tie in your CDC feather by the tip.   Stroke the fibers back and then make a few closely spaced wraps.  The barbs should point to the bend of the hook.  Tie it off and trim the ‘butt’ end of the CDC hackle.  Next, prepare a Coq de Leon hen feather in the same manner.  Tie it in by the butt end.  Make two wraps with the feather and tie it off.  Trim off the ‘butt’ end and whip finish the fly.  You may apply a drop of head cement if you  wish. 
Below is an instructional video on how to tie this fly:
If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month, I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com . 



Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Paul's November 2016 Fly of the Month

Birds Nest



Hook:  Diiachi 1710 in sizes #12 to 16 (or hook of choice).
Thread:  Tan 6/0 or 8/0.
Weight (optional):  5-6 lead wraps starting 1/3 hook shank length from eye.
Tail:  Mallard or wood duck fibers, bronze in color (or to match natural).
Rib:  Copper wire.
Abdomen:  Grey/tan Australian possum dubbing or buggy nymph dubbing of  choice.
Hackle:  Mallard or wood duck fibers
Thorax:  Same as the Abdomen but dubbed buggy with a dubbing loop
You want to catch fish?  USE THIS FLY!  Many have said that this fly is not really a nymph, nor is it a winged wet fly.  It's more of a hybrid that really catches fish.  I've fished it as a nymph, but have had far more productive days fishing it as a wet fly beneath the surface film.  The birds nest is a fly pattern created in 1959 by a gentleman by the name of Cal Bird.  He fished it on the Truckee River in California.  There are only a few materials to this pattern and it's a very easy tie.  There are other versions of this fly, like the Depth Charge Bird's Nest, but it's more like a traditional bead head nymph.  This hybrid version is what I love to fish.
When tying this fly you have the option of tying it with or without lead weight.  For larger sizes I usually put a few wraps of lead at the center of the hook shank.  Smaller sizes I tie without the lead.  By the way it's a great pattern to tie in smaller sizes.  What's great about this fly is you can adapt the size and colors to mimic any bug hatch.  If you use lead, cover it with thread wraps, if not, begin your thread approximately 2/3rds up the hook shank.  Tie in your mallard or wood duck fibers.  Tie in your copper wire rib.  Next, dub a slightly tapered body from the tail to where you initially started your thread (2/3reds up the hook shank).  Rib the abdomen with your copper wire.  Tie the wire down and clip off the tag end.  Next affix your wood duck or mallard fibers as "hackle" for this fly.  They should extend to the bend of the hook.  When mounting them square off the tips.  One method to do this is o strip them from the feather and align them.  Next, mount them on the hook.  You want to use some loose wraps at first.  Rotate the fibers around the hook shank as you tighten up your thread.  Next you're going to dub your thorax.  You want it to look very buggy.  To accomplish this I use a dubbing loop for larger flies.  For smaller flies I create a loop by splitting my tying thread off the hook shank.  I place the dubbing material in the loop, spin it and dub the thorax.  Create a small thread head.  Tie it off and apply some head cememt. 
Hans Weilenmannhas has a great instructional video on how to tie this pattern below:
If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of the month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com .  This pattern can also be viewed at www.tightlinesflyfishing.blogspot.com .



Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Paul's October 2016 Fly of the Month

Barr's Bouface Streamer



Hook:  TMC 200R Size #4-#12. 
Tying thread:   6/0 (color to match the streamer color).
Bead:  Black tungsten or brass bead.
Wing/Tail:  Pine squirrel zonker strip.
Flash:  Two strips of pearl Flashabou on each side of streamer.
Collar:  Marabou.
Head:  Spiky Squirrel Dubbing.
This is the second time that I have posted a Jim Barr streamer as the Fly of the Month.  The first was his “slumpbuster”, but this spring I’ve really started to fall in love with this pattern.  My friend and HFFA member Will Stone turned me on to it. 
I tie this fly in black, olive, brown, and orange.  So far I’ve had the most success with olive on the Hous and smaller streams.  Some tyers use rabbit zonker strips instead of squirrel.  I’m sure rabbit works fine, but this is a smaller trout streamer and using the smaller condensed squirrel zonkers just seem to be a better fit.
Begin by placing your black bead on the hook.  To get down deeper you can use a tungsten bead instead of a brass one.    Take 6-7 wraps of .015 lead behind the bead.  Push it up tight behind the bead and give it a coat with ‘hard as nails’.  Next start your thread behind the bead and make tight wraps to down to the bend in the hook (leave it even with the hook barb).  You will be tying in your wing at the bend of the hook.  Cut a pine squirrel zonker strip to mount on the hook shank.  The length should extend from just behind the bead to approximately 2-3 hook gaps length beyond the bend of the hook.  Separate the wing fibers with your fingers and lash the back end of the wing onto the hook shank between the separated squirrel fibers.  Apply a drop of glue to the wraps.  Lift the wing and wrap your thread forward to the front tie in point (a hook eye length behind the bead).  I usually strip the squirrel hairs/fibers off the very tip of the zonker strip to ensure that the thread really binds down the wing.  Secure the front part of the wing with numerous thread wraps.  Apply another drop of head cement to them.  Next, tie in two (2) pieces of pearl flash-a-bou on each side of the fly.  They should extend from the front wing tie in point to the end of the zonker strip.  Next, tie in a marabou feather on each side of the fly at the same tie in point.  The tip of the feather should extend to the hook barb.   Trim the butt ends of the marabou feathers leaving enough room for a dubbed head.  Finally, dub a head with spiky squirrel dubbing (or if you want a little flash use laser or ice dubbing).  Whip finish the fly and apply a drop of head cement to the final wraps.
My favorite way to fish this streamer is to cast it across stream and let it drift down below me.  Keep it in the run below you and let it freely dangle in the current.  You’ll be amazed at the results of this fishing technique. 

Ryan Keyes of RK Fly design has a great video on how to tie this fly below:
You can click on any of the pictures on this site to enlarge them.

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month, I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com . 

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Paul's September 2016 Fly of the Month

Rats Nest

Hook:  TMC 2302 or 2312 Size #6-#10. 

Tying thread:   UTC 140 in Grey Brown.
Bead:  Black Tungsten.
Body & Tail:   Senyo Olive Laser Dub #263.
Rib:  Olive Flexi Floss.

This fly imitates a crane fly larva.  What’s a crane fly you might ask?  Well it’s those big oversized mosquito like bugs you see dangling on the surface of the water.  They can reach a length of 2 ½” with a wingspan of 3”.  They are a grayish olive brown and the trout on the Farmington River love them!  Besides being a crane fly nymph imitation, this fly has a buggyness about it that trout can’t resist.  It was developed by CT’s own Rich Strolis.  Rich is a well known Housatonic & Farmington River Guide, nationally known fly tier, and author.  His articles have appeared in ‘Fly Fisherman’ & ‘Eastern Fly Fishing’ magazines.  He is also the author of the book ‘Catching Shadows: Tying Flies For The Toughest Fish and Strategies For Fishing Them’.  I strongly recommend visiting his website at www.catchingshadows.com . 
This is a very simple fly to tie.  It consists of only a few materials, Laser Dub, Flexi Floss, a bead and some lead weight.  Begin by placing your black tungsten bead on the hook.  Behind it lay down wraps of lead all the way down to the shank, until it’s even with the hook barb.  Next, tie on your thread.  Wrap up and down your lead wraps a few times.  Leave it behind the bead.  Prepare a clump of Laser Dub, approximately (2) two inches in length, and about the thickness of a pencil.  Tie it in right behind the bead.  You want to tie it with wraps in the middle of the clump. Next, double it over and stroke all the fibers back towards the bend.  Shape and create a uniform body the length of the hook shank.  Take your thread and, with broad wraps, palmer it back towards the hook bend.  Stop right above the hook barb and make a few additional wraps with your thread.  In the process you must have enough dubbing material to form a tail beyond the hook bend.  The tail should be at least a hook gap length beyond the bend of the hook.  You can tear any excess dubbing material from the tail if it is too long.  Next, tie in your Flexi Floss rib.  Make a dubbing loop with your thread at the rib tie in point.  Advance your thread so that it is behind the bead.   Place clumps of olive laser dubbing in the dubbing loop and spin a dense buggy ‘brush’.  There’s a number of fly tying tools that are available to do this.  Once you create your dubbing brush/rope, advance and wrap it forward to behind the bead.  You should have a uniform body.  Tie the dubbing rope off with multiple wraps of thread.  Leave your thread behind the bead.  Next, palmer your rib forward with uniform wraps.  Tie the rib off behind the bead.  Whip finish your fly and apply a drop of head cement to your final wraps.  Finally, take a Velcro brush or a tooth brush, and stroke out the material to give the fly a buggy and veiled appearance. 

To fish this fly, nymph it, swing it like a wet fly, or strip it back like a streamer.   It’s all good and it all works.  Rich Strolis has a great instructional video on how to tie this pattern on Vimeo.   Just click on this link  https://vimeo.com/145225238 .


If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of the month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com . 



Monday, May 16, 2016

Paul's June 2016 Fly of the Month

Tungsten Torpedo






Hook:  Jig Hook Size #14 to#18.  (I use Allen Fly Fishing J100 BL hooks.)
Tying thread:   Olive 8/0 Uni Thread.
Bead:  Gold Tungsten Bead, slotted or regular.  (I also use copper & rainbow colored beads).
Weight:  5-6 wraps of .015 lead behind the bead.
Tail:  Cul de Leon feather fibers.  (I’ve also used wood duck).
Abdomen/Body:  Olive Thread.
Rib #1:   Small Uni Wire - Gold.
Rib #2:   Sulky Metallic Black Tinsel.  (This is a thin flash material.  If it isn’t
                available at your local fly shop many craft stores carry it.)
Thorax:  Synthetic black Peacock dubbing.
Here’s is yet another great nymph pattern tied on a jig hook with a tungsten bead.  I’ve been fly fishing for a number of years, but this year I’m having my best spring ever bringing trout to the net.  Why?  Well I’ve done two things completely different from what I’ve done in the past.  The first is that I’ve been making my own “euro-nymphing” specific leaders.  (Saving some money doing that too!)  The second is that I’m fishing a lot of flies with tungsten beads tied on a jig hook.  Not only do they get down into the water column, but they have great hooking power as well. 
Begin by placing your gold tungsten bead on the hook.  You can use a “slotted” or traditional bead.  Next begin your thread behind the bead, cover the lead, and wind down to the bend of the hook.  Form a slender tapered body.  Next tie in your Cul de Leon fibers to create a tail.  The tail should be approximately the length of the hook shank.  Next, tie in your ribs, the black tinsel first and the gold wire second.  Bring your thread up behind the bead.  Wrap/palmer your gold wire forward.  Tie it off behind the bead.  Next, palmer/wrap your black tinsel forward.  When you do, be careful to locate your wraps between the previous wraps of gold wire.   Tie it off behind the bead.  You can also coat the body/abdomen with “hard as nails” to give it a little more durability.    Next, dub your thorax behind the bead.  Tie and cut it off.  Cut and tie it off your thread with a whip finish behind the bead.  Apply a drop of head cement if you so desire. 
A gentleman by the name of Gilbert Rowley of Fly tying 123, has a great instructional video on how to tie this pattern below.


If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month, I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com . 

Sunday, May 1, 2016

Paul's May 2016 Fly of the Month

May Day May Fly

(Back & Wine Colored)

 


Hook:  Jig Hook Size #10-#18.  I use Allen Fly Fishing J100 BL hooks.
Tying thread:   UTC 70 denier Black.
Bead:  Black tungsten bead (I like to use rainbow colored beads).
Tail:  Cul de Leon feather fibers.
Abdomen:  Black Holographic tinsel.
Rib:   Wine colored Ultra-wire ‘brassie’ sized wire.
Thorax:  Black Semi-Seal Dubbing (I also use Black Ice Dub).
“You want to get down to the bottom where the fish are?”  Use a jig hook with a tungsten bead.  I’m fishing more and more nymphs tied on a jig hook when I want to fish deep.  Most “tactical” jig hooks are barbless and extremely sharp.  When you’re playing a fish make sure you keep constant tension on your line.  As easy as it is to hook a fish with these sharp hooks, it’s also easy for the hook to dislodge from the fish when line tension is relaxed.
This pattern is very easy to tie.  You don’t have to tie it in Black & Wine.  Try olive with a chartreuse wire rib, brown with a yellow wire rib, or any colors you want to experiment with.  Begin by placing your black tungsten bead on the hook.  You can use a “slotted bead” if you desire.  I find that traditional beads work fine in most cases.  Next begin your thread behind the bead and wind down to the bend of the hook.  Tie in your Cul de Leon fibers to create a tail.  The tail should be approximately the length of the hook shank.  Next, tie in your wine colored wire for a rib.  Tie in a strand of Black holographic tinsel to be used for the abdomen.   Bring your thread up behind the bead.  Wrap your black tinsel forward to create your abdomen.  You are going to leave enough room to dub your thorax behind the bead.  Tie and cut it off.  Rib the abdomen with your wine colored wire.  Cut and tie it off.  Next dub your black thorax.  Whip finish behind the bead.  Apply a drop of head cement if you so desire.
Below is a great instructional video by Gilbert Rowley of Fly tying 123 on how to tie this pattern:
If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month, I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com . 



Friday, March 25, 2016

Paul's April 2016 Fly of the Month

Paul’s Sand Eel

(a.k.a. the fly most of which originated from Kenny Abrames)

 


Hook:  Mustad #34007 or salt water hook of preference, size #1. 

Thread: Clear monofilament.  The head of the fly is tied with flat waxed white thread. 

Tail:  Approximately 20 white bucktail hairs, topped by 4 strands of holographic tinsel, topped by a thin yellow saddle hackle, topped by a thin olive grizzly hackle, topped by a thin white grizzly hackle.

Body:  Pearlescent mylar tubing.  Coated with 5 minute epoxy.

Eyes:  3D eyes.  Coated with 5 minute epoxy.

I have been tying this fly for so many years I had forgotten where I got it.  With a little investigation I discovered it probably originated as Kenny Abrames’ Eely fly pattern.   Way back when, in the early 90’s, Ken’s book ‘Striper Moon’, his perspective on fly fishing techniques, and his flies, were the ‘buzz’ of the salt water fly fishing world.  I’ve modified his fly in a number of ways.  I’ve added a little flash to the tail.  Also, I coat the body with epoxy for durability.  It also makes the body more translucent with the darker trailing feathers on top.  Finally, I’ve added eyes to the fly.  Some may argue that the eyes and the epoxy have a negative impact on the movement and fluidity of the fly, but it’s worked for me.  With sand eels sometimes “thin is in”.  This fly has been a great producer for me throughout the years.   Most recently I fished it in Puerto Rico and had great luck with it for non-striper species.

Begin by starting your thread behind the hook eye and wrap back to the bend.  Tie in your white bucktail.  I usually tie it in right behind my hook eye and wrap it down to the bend.  The bucktail should extend approximately 2 ½ times the length of the hook shank beyond the bend.  Tie in your holographic flash the same way but extend it an additional half inch beyond the bucktail.  Next, top the tail with a thin yellow saddle hackle.  It should also extend a half inch beyond your bucktail.  Top that with a thin grizzly olive saddle hackle.  Top that with a white grizzly saddle hackle.  Bring your clear mono thread up behind the hook eye.  Whip finish and tie it off.  Cut a piece of mylar tubing the length of the hook shank.  Slip it over the hook eye and onto the hook shank.  Bind it down behind the hook eye with flat waxed white thread.  Also, form a small head upon which you will affix your 3D eyes.  Coat the body and the eyes with 5 minute epoxy.  The most important thing to remember with this pattern is to keep it thin.  Experiment with what works best for you.  Try different sizes and colors.  I think you’ll find it to be an indispensible addition to your salt water fly box.
Below is a brief video on how to tie this Flat Wing Sand Eel:

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of the month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com . 

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Paul's March 2016 Fly of the Month

Tungsten Jig Hook Surveyor



Hook:  Allen size #12 jig hook, or jig hook of choice.
Thread:  Red thread.
Weight:  5-6 lead wraps behind the bead.
Bead:  Gold bead to match the hook.
Tail:  Cul de conard fibers.
Rib:  Silver wire.
Abdomen:  Light rainbow sow scud dubbing.
Collar:  Dark rainbow sow scud dubbing.
Hot spot:  Red thread.

This is one of my favorite jig head flies.  I use it as a point fly when I’m fishing two nymphs in tandem.  The rainbow sow scud dubbing that comprises the fly is a great dubbing.  It’s well known as a component in tying “Rainbow Warriors”.  If you fish that fly you know what a great producer it is.   Well sometimes more is even better.  That’s what this nymph has, more sow scud rainbow dubbing. 
Begin by placing your gold bead on the hook.  Some tyers use a slotted bead.  I find that regular beads fit perfectly.  Take approximately 5-6 wraps of lead behind the bead.  Next, start your thread, cover the lead wraps, then form a slender and tapered body.  Now tie in your cul de conard fibers for a tail.  They should be approximately ½ the length of the hook shank.  Next, tie in your silver wire for your rib.  You are now going to dub an abdomen of light rainbow sow scud dubbing.  Leave enough room for your collar and ‘hot spot’.  Next, rib your fly with the silver wire. Dub your collar with dark rainbow sow scud dubbing.  Form a hot spot with your red thread right behind the bead.  Whip finish and apply some head cement to your wraps and you’re done.  How easy is that ! 

Gilbert Rowley of Fly Tying 123 has a great video on how to tie it below:




If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com .

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Paul's February 2016 Fly of the Month

Zebra Midge

Hook:  Tiemco 2457 or 2487  Size #16-#26. 
Tying thread:   Black 8/0 or UTC 70.
Bead:  Bead of choice – Traditionally a silver metal bead.  Tyers also use glass beads.  My favorite is a white metal bead.
Body:  Black 8/0 or UTC 70.  You can also tie it in red, olive, brown or color of  choice.
Rib:  Small silver wire.
Wing (optional):  Two (2) strands of pearl Krystal Flash. 
Many fly tyers are very hesitant to tie small flies.  The Zebra Midge is an excellent pattern to begin “tying small”.  When tying small flies remember that “less is better”.  It doesn’t get much simpler than this pattern.  Zebra midges imitate midges in the larval form.  They are on the water all year long and are known as Chironomids.   In the larval state they are also known as “blood worms”.   This pattern originated in Arizona along the Colorado River.  It’s attributed to a guide by the name of Ted Welling.  It’s an excellent fly for rivers and still water bodies.
Begin by placing your bead on the hook.  Start your thread behind the bead and wrap down past the bend of the hook.  Bring your thread back up behind the bead and tie in your silver rib.   Cover it completely and form a tapered slender body for your fly.  End with your thread behind the bead.  At this point I do something a little different than most tyers.  I coat the body of the fly with “tough as nails”.  It provides a little sheen and durability.  I then wrap my rib up behind the eye.  Clip the tag end and tie it off.  Your fly is done.  There are countless variations to this fly from changing the color thread used; to placing a hot spot in back of the bead; to tying in a wing bud of two strands of Krystal Flash.  One of the great things about fly tying is experimenting and seeing what works best on the stream.  See what works best for you.   
There is a great instructional video by Tight lines video below.

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com .