Friday, November 19, 2021

Paul's December 2021 Fly of the Month

 Garner's White Trash


Hook:  Gamakatsu B10S Size #2 Stinger hook. 

Thread:  12/0 White Waxed.

Eyes:   Large dumbbell eyes, color of choice.

Tail:  White Artic Fox Fur over 4-5 Strands of Pearl Krystal Flash doubled around your thread.

Body:  Wide White Rabbit Zonker Strip.

Collar:  Fluorescent Yellow Palmer Chenille medium length, 6-8 wraps.  

Head (Behind eyes):  Behind the eyes tie in 2 clumps of White Artic Fox, 1 on the top & 1 under the hook shank.  Then, do the same with 2 clumps of Senyo Lazer Dub in Silver Minnow Belly.  Stroke and comb all fibers rearward.

Head (In front of the eyes):  In front of the eyes tie in 4 more clumps of Senyo Lazer Dub in Silver Minnow Belly.  2 on top of the hook shank and 2 on the bottom.  Stroke and comb all fibers rearward. 

This fly was developed by Fly Tyer Garner Reid of the Cohutta Fishing Company.  To tie it place your Gamakatsu B10S Size #2 Stinger hook in the vice.  Begin your thread behind the eye an wrap down to the bend of the hook.  Cut off your tag end.  You are not going to tie in your Large Dumbbell Eyes, just as you would with a traditional clouser.  It should be located a Dumbbell Eye length behind the eye of the hook.  Use figure eight wraps to affix it with a drop of your favorite adhesive.  Next you are going to tie in your Pearl Krystal Flash for your tail.  Take 4-5 strands of Krystal Flash, double it around your thread and tie it down on top of your hook shank.  It should extend 2 hook shank lengths behind the bend of the hook.  At the bend, and on top of your Krystal Flash, tie in a clump of Artic Fox Fur.  It should be half the length of your Krystal Flash.  

Next, take your Texas Cut ‘Wide’ Zonker Strip and measure it on the hook shank so that it will extend the length of the Kristal Flash. To do this, I measure it and mark a point where the hook shank will pass through it.  I then take a bodkin and pierce the hide.  Remove your hook from the vice and put your hook point through the hole you created.   At the end of the Zonker I notch it to create a ‘V’ which points rearward.  With your hook back in the vice, bind down the Rabbit Strip with your thread.  Remember that this fly will fish inverted with the dumbbell eyes on the bottom and the hook point on top.  When you tie it down advance your thread halfway up the hook shank, leaving space behind your eyes to tie in your collar head behind the eyes.  Next, tie in your Yellow Palmer Chenille.  Take 6-8 wraps and then tie it off. 


Behind the eyes tie in 2 clumps of White Artic Fox, 1 on the top & 1 under the hook shank.  Then, do the same with 2 clumps of Senyo Lazer Dub in Silver Minnow Belly.  When you bind down the Lazer Dub, tie it in at the midpoint, then sweep rearward the remaining material. Take thread wraps in front of it to secure it (‘hollow tie technique’).  Stroke and comb all fibers rearward.  In front of the eyes tie in 4 more clumps of Senyo Lazer Dub in Silver Minnow Belly.  2 on top of the hook shank and 2 on the bottom.  Use the same technique to tie in the Lazer Dub that you used behind the eyes.  Stroke and comb all fibers rearward.  Tie off the fly at the hook eye and apply your favorite adhesive.

Gink and Gasoline has a great video on how to tie this fly below:  


If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com .


Wednesday, November 3, 2021

Paul's November 2021 Bonus Fly of the Month

 Spent Early Smoky-Winged Caddis

 




Hook:  Size #18 1X Dry Fly Hook.

Thread:  Black.

Body:  Brown Super Fine Dry Fly Dubbing.

Wing:  Western Caddis Grey EP Trigger Point Fibers or similar wing material.

 Hook:  Size #18 1X Dry Fly Hook.

This is a great spent caddis pattern that floats flat in the surface film.  The design mimics how spent caddis lay splayed on the surface with their two (2) sets of wings.  This fly has caught a lot of trout for me. 

 

To tie this fly, begin by debarbing the hook and placing it in your vice.  Tie in your thread leaving an eye length space behind the eye.  Cut the tag end and wrap back on the shank to the hook point.  Now dub a slender noodle of Brown Super Fine Dry Fly Dubbing.  Start your body at the hook bend.  Before wrapping the body with ‘touching’ wraps, twist your dubbing noodle in a clockwise direction.  You want to compress it so that when you wrap forward it results in a tapered segmented body.  Your body should end slightly behind the eye of the hook. 

 

Now take a wrap or two back on the fly body.  Your thread should be approximately an ‘eye length and ½’ behind the hook eye.  Next, cut and prepare a sparse amount of wing material.  For a size #18 fly, the length should be approximately 3” long.  Tie it in on the far side of the hook with 1 ½” extending beyond the hook eye.  Once tied in, form a loop beyond the hook eye and anchor the wing material on the other side of the hook.  After making some securing wings, you might want to apply a small drop of super glue on the thread wraps where the wings intersect. Next dub a small noodle to cover the thread wraps that bind down the fibers.  Now pull the front wing loop back and take a few wraps of thread in front of it.  Do a 4-5 wrap whip finish and trim off your thread.  Pull your wing loop back forward into a horizontal position in front of the eye.  You’re now going to trim the wings of the fly.  Take your rear wings and pull them back.  Trim them off so that they extend just beyond the hook bend.  At the front of the fly simply clip off the top part of the loop to create much smaller wings that point forward.   

 

Tightlinevideo has a great instructional video on how to tie this fly below:



If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of

The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com .

Thursday, October 28, 2021

Paul's November 2021 Fly of the Month

                                          Iso Jig Nymph                                     (A Fly by Steve Yewchuck)


Bead:  1/8” Silver Disco Tungsten Bead.

Hook:  Ahrex CZ Mini Jig Size #10. 

Thread:  UTC 70 Black.

Tail:  Brown Marabou with trimmed tips.

Rib:  Small Black Round Wire.

Abdomen:  Brown marabou spun into a rope and palmered.

Stripe:  Dental Floss (it never stains).  

Wing Case:  Swiss Straw with a drop of UV resin.

Thorax:  Dark Nymph Dub.

Legs:  Pheasant Tail Fibers.

This is one of my favorite patterns for an isonychia nymph.  The jig hook and tungsten bead gets it down on the bottom fast.  That’s where you want your iso nymph to be.  The natural crawls all over the bottom of rivers and streams.  This fly also includes the very recognizable stripe that all iso nymphs have.  This fly was tied/developed by fellow CT fly tyer extraordinaire Steve Yewchuck.  It’s got everything you want in an iso nymph pattern.  When you tie this fly remember that it will fish with the hook inverted. To tie this fly, place your Tungsten Bead on your hook and your hook in the vice.  Start your thread behind the bead and wrap rearward to the bend of the hook.  Trim/cut your tag end.  Tie in 5-6 Brown Marabou Fibers for your tail.  You can leave the butt ends of the Marabou Fibers to use for your Abdomen.  I tie them back with a wrap of thread or two.  Trim the tail with your scissors or finger nails.  It should be approximately the length of the hook gap.  On what will become the ‘underside’ of your nymph, tie in your Black Wire Rib. 


On what will become the ‘top’ side of your nymph, tie in a strand Dental Floss for the body stripe.  Now, twist the butt ends of the Marabou Fibers to create a rope for your abdomen (you can add additional fibers if needed).  Palmer it 2/3rds up the hook shank with ‘touching’ wraps to create your abdomen.  Tie and clip off the butt ends.  Bring your Dental Floss forward for your body stripe.  Tie it down at the end of your abdomen but do not clip off the butt end.  Next, palmer your rib forward to create a segmented body.  Tie and ‘helicopter’ off the butt end of your wire. 

For your abdomen, first place your Dental Floss rearward.  Now tie in your Swiss Straw to be used for your wing case.  Next, dub most of your Thorax with a Dark Nymph Dubbing.  On each side of the nymph, tie in 6-8 Pheasant Tail Fibers for the legs.  Use a little more Dubbing in front of the legs to even out your Abdomen.  Bring your Swiss Straw Wing Case forward and tie it off.  Clip off any excess.  Bring your Dental Floss Stripe forward and tie it off.  Clip off the butt end and whip finish the fly.  Finally add a drop of UV Resin to the Wing Case and use a bodkin to evenly coat it.  Cure it with your UV Light.  Good luck fishing this great iso pattern.

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com .


Monday, October 18, 2021

Paul's October 2021 Bonus Fly of the Month

 Squirrel & Herl Bugger




Hook:  Daiichi 710 Size #8 3X long Streamer Hook.

Bead:  (Optional) Tungsten bead.

Tying Thread:   UTC 140 Denier Black Thread.

Body:  3-4 Strands of Peacock Herl.

Wing:  Olive Pine Squirrel Zonker.

Hackle:  Grizzly Died Olive Bugger Saddle Hackle.

Collar:  (Optional)  Olive Ice Dub.

 

This is yet another streamer type fly tied with ‘Pine Squirrel’.  I love small streamers!  And I love small streamers with Pine Squirrel!  This pattern is simply a cross between two great trout flies, a Wooly Bugger & a Zonker.  It’s just got to be a fish magnet.

 

To begin this fly, place your hook in the vice.  Start your thread an eye length behind the eye.  After making securing wraps and cutting off the butt end of your thread, tie in 3-4 strands of Peacock Herl.  Keep the Peacock Herl on top of the hook shank and wrap back to the bend of the hook.  Next, prepare your Pine Squirrel Zonker.  Measure you Zonker on top of the hook shank.  You’re going to tie it in at the bend with the tail being a hook shank length beyond the bend.  When you tie it in separate the wing hairs on the hide.  Tie in the Zonker at the separation point on the hide with 4-5 strong thread wraps.  Advance your thread in front of the Zonker.  Next, make touching wraps with your Peacock Herl up the hook shank and behind your tying thread.  When you reach your initial tie in point, secure the Peacock with 3-4 turns of your tying thread.  Clip the butt ends of the Peacock.  Now, select a Grizzly Bugger Saddle Hackle and tie it in at your initial tie in point.  Using open spiral wraps, advance your thread to where your Zonker is tied onto the hook shank.  Grab the Saddle Hackle by the tip with your hackle pliers.  Make open spiral wraps (palmer) down to your tying thread.  When you get to the back of the body, secure your hackle with your tying thread.  Then, make open spiral wraps with your tying thread all the way up to the hook eye.  Clip off the tip of your excess Saddle Hackle.  Now, grab your front Saddle Hackle fibers with your fingers and sweep them back.  Make thread wraps in front of them.  Pull your Squirrel Zonker Strip forward, making sure it lays flat on top of the hook shank.  You are going to tie it in behind the hook eye, again separating the wing fibers to expose a nice tie in point on the hide.  After it’s tied down, pull the Zonker Strip back and clip off the excess.  Finally, produce a nice neat head on the fly and apply head cement or UV Resin. 

 

I will also tie this fly with a tungsten bead if I need to get it down deep.  I also give it a collar behind the bead with ice dub.  As with any fly, it’s all up to you.  Experiment and vary the fly to meet your needs

Tightlinevideo has a great video on how to tie this fly below:


 

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com

Thursday, September 30, 2021

Paul's October 2021 Fly of the Month

 September Night Fly

(a pattern by Ken Abrames)



Hook:  Eagle Claw 253 or salt water hook of preference, sizes #1/0 to #3/0.   

Thread:  White flymaster.

Tail:  Long gray bucktail, under two pieces of silver flash, under two white saddles.

Body:  Silver mylar tubing.

Throat:  White bucktail as a ¾ colar, bottom and both sides one hair thick.

Collar:  White marabou, folded or doubled three turns.

Wing:  Long white bucktail under 15 pieces of purple bucktail under two pieces of blue flash under one natural black saddle

When Ken Abrames book “Striper Moon” came out back in 1994, it introduced a number of different and unique fly patterns to a group of fly fishers just discovering the joys of salt water fly fishing.   These flies were very impressionistic and fluid.  They included flies such as the “Razzle Dazzle”, “Eely”, and “Ray’s Fly”.  Back then it seemed everyone was tying and using these patterns in CT and RI.   Although these flies will work anywhere, they represented and brought focus on the CT-RI region. 

According to Ken this fly imitates finger mullet.  Mullet move through RI in the fall.  They are also a predominate bait fish along the shores of Cape Cod in August/September.  It should be tied “in full silhouette” and “about as thick around as a man’s index finger”.   This is just a great fly any time of year.  I always think to myself “Why don’t I use this fly more”.  This year for sure. 

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of

The month I can be reached at 203 305-3854 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com .                    

Wednesday, June 30, 2021

Paul's July 2021 Bonus Fly of the Month

 Gotcha



Hook – Mustad 34007  Size 2         Thread – Pink

Eyes – Chrome or nickel dumb bell eyes (I epoxy or use UV resin on my thread wraps around the eyes for extra strength)

Underbody – Pink thread, topped with pearl body braid.  Pearl body braid is teased out near the bend of the hook.

Over-body – Clear larva lace

Wing -  Blond craft fur topped with approximately 6 strands of rainbow crystal flash. (For larger flies I’ll substitute White Bucktail for the Blond Craft Fur). 

I have been doing the Fly of the Month for over 35 years now. Of all the flies I’ve ever posted this has to be what I would term as one of my “magic flies”.  If you fish the salt in CT you need to have this fly in your box.  I live at the mouth of the Housatonic River, and love fishing for shad, both the American and Hickory species.  Catching these “baby” tarpon like fish is a great thrill on a lighter rod.  Back in 1998 I really focused on fishing a great number of shad flies.   The “Gotcha” out fished all other traditional shad patterns.   It wasn’t even close.   

This fly was originally developed for bonefish, but has been adapted for New England fishing.   An old time friend, Ed Goodwin, introduced me to it.  What really makes this fly extraordinary is that it is also a cross over pattern for stripers.  Stripers will readily hit this fly.  At times they take it for a crab, shrimp, or even a glass minnow.   Friend Ben Marouski ties this fly with a White Bucktail wing and slays stripers with it.  This thing really glows in the water.   This fly is such an amazing producer that I am constantly approached by fellow fishermen who ask what I’m using. 

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a pattern of the month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@frontier.com .  

Thursday, May 6, 2021

Paul's May 2021 Bonus Fly of the Month

 Jigged Golden Retriever



Hook:  Tiemco TMC Size #8 413J Jig Hook.

Bead:  Gold Tungsten Slotted bead 5/32”.

Tying thread:   Red Danville’s Flat Waxed Nylon.

Weight:  Lead Wire .025.

Tail:  Wooly Bugger Tan Marabou.

Body:  Gold Estaz standard size. 

This fly originates from the Mossy Creek Fly Shop in Harrisonburg, VA.  It’s a variation of a bugger called the Golden Retriever, which is tied on a standard streamer hook.  (It was a featured Fly of the Month many years ago)  I’ve been tying more and more streamers on a jig hooks lately.  The jerking action created by the jig hook makes this fly so much more deadly.  It also helps to prevent snagging bottom.  Some fly guys know that this is one of the ‘secret magic flies’.  It catches fish everywhere and if you fish Grand Lake Stream in ME, this fly is a must in your box.  You can tie these in a variety of colors, but this fly has made it’s name with gold Estaz and a tan Marabou tail.  A great fish catcher that can also be used as an anchor fly that gets your rig deep. 

Normally you can use a thread of your preference for the flies I feature.  In this case I strongly recommend you use Danville’s Flat Waxed Nylon.  

To tie this fly place your tungsten bead on the hook.  With the hook in your vice,   start you Lead Wire on the hook shank at approximately the location above the hook point.  Make wraps up to the bead.  Break off your lead wire.  Next, start your Red Thread behind the Lead wraps to lock it in place.  After you create a thread dam behind the lead, wrap your thread forward covering your lead wraps. 

Make sure all of the lead is covered.  Your ‘underbody’ should be all Red thread.

Advance your thread back to the end of the hook shank.  You’re now going to tie in your Marabou Tail.  It should be 1 to 1 ½ hook shank in length.  When you tie it in your actually filling in the hook shank behind your lead wraps to create an even symmetrical fly body.  Next, tie in your Gold Estaz at your Marabou tie in point.  Make sure the Estaz fibers are facing ‘down’ when you tie it in so that the fibers end up pointing rearward on the hook.  Now, palmer the Estaz forward making even wraps that leave some of your Red Thread underbody exposed.  When you wrap it forward with one hand stroke the fibers rearward with the other hand.  End your wraps behind the bead.  Tie the Estaz off with your thread.  Clip off the butt end.  Whip finish the fly with your thread creating a small red ‘hotspot’ behind the bead.  Apply some head cement. 

Mossy Creek Fly fishing has a great instructional video on how to tie the Jigged Golden Retriever below:


If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com