Friday, February 28, 2020

Paul's March 2020 Fly of the Month

Nuclear Caddis



Hook:  Size #14 Hanak 333BL or favorite curved nymph hook.
Bead:  Chartreuse Tungsten bead size 7/64’ (3.0mm). 
Tying Thread:   UTC Ultra thread 70 Denier – Fl. Orange . 
Body:  Synthetic quill in Fluorescent Orange, coated with UV Resin.
Wing Case:  Waspi Thin Skin in brown, tan, or black .
Thorax/Collar:  Hareline Peacock Black Ice Dubbing.

This fly is a beacon in the water.  The entire fly is a ‘hot spot’.  I recently fished it in tandem with a buggy and more natural looking nymph.  In doing so I caught my first trout of 2020 on this fly.  For the first time I used an artificial quill.  It creates a very nice segmented body.  Most fly shops & suppliers carry 2 or 3 different types of quills.  Coated with UV Resin, it’s indestructible. 

To tie this fly, begin by placing your bead on your hook.  Please note that there are many new competition style hooks out there.  Sometimes the curve and actual hook size differ.  Even with beads, size and weight can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer.  Just match the bead and hook to reflect how fast and deep you want the fly to sink.  Next, start you hook behind the eye and create a tapered body from the bend of the hook to behind the eye.  Bring your thread back to the bend of the hook and tie in your synthetic quill.  Bring the thread back up behind the bead.  With hackle pliers, palmer your quill forward creating a segmented body.  Leave some room for your wing case and thorax/collar.  Tie it off and cut off the tag end.  Coat the body with your preferred UV resin and cure it with your light.  Next, tie in your thin skin wing case.  Fold it back.  Now dub in your collar of Hareline Peacock Black Ice Dub.  Fold the wing case forward and tie it off behind the bead.  Apply a drop of UV resin on your wing case.  Cure it with your light and your done.

Fly Fisherman and Tier, Raymond Collette, has a great instructional video on how to tie this fly below:



If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com .

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Paul's February 2020 Fly of the Month

The Countach Squirrel Jig Nymph



Hook:  Size #10 Firehole Sticks 516 Jig Hook or favorite nymph barbless jig hook.
Bead:  Gold Tungsten slotted bead size 5/32’ (3.8mm). 
Tying Thread:   UTC Ultra thread 70 Denier – Fl. Orange . 
Tail/Legs:  Grizzly Micro Legs – Root beer.
Rib:  Midge Sparkle Braid – Root beer.
Body/Collar: Natural Furs Dubbing – Fox Squirrel.

This fly comes from the website called ‘Fly Fish Food’, the home site of Clark Piece & Curtis Fry.  It is named after a group of fly fishing friends who called their gathering the “Countach” Fly Fishing Club.  This is another variation of a ‘Hares Ear’/’Squirrel’ dubbed nymph.  What’s important to take from this version is the addition of rubber legs.  I was never a big fan of nymphs with rubber legs, but after fly fishing ‘golden stones’ with them, it changed me forever.  Sometimes the addition of legs is what triggers trout to hit this fly. 

Begin by placing your bead on the hook and mount it in your vice.  Start your thread immediately behind the bead.  Lock your bead into place with your thread.  Bring your thread back to the end of the bend.  Tie in your tail of Micro legs to form a split ‘V’ tail on your nymph.  Next tie in your rib of Root beer Midge Sparkle Braid.  Tie it in behind the bead and wrap back down to your tail.  Next, begin to dub your squirrel body.  You can tie this fly in any color.  Darker colors or black can represent a stone fly.  Dub up to and behind the bead.  Next, counter wrap your rib taking even wraps along the body to give it a segmented look.  Tie and cut the tag end off behind the bead.  Now, make a short dubbing loop.  Your going to build up the dubbing loop with more squirrel.  Twist the dubbing loop & squirrel with your dubbing tool.  It should create a spiky-buggy dubbing brush.  Now wrap that dubbing brush behind the bead.  Usually, 3 wraps will do it.  Tie and clip it off.  Bring your thread back behind the bead.  Give it a couple wraps here.  You are now going to tie on some rubber legs on each side of the hook shank.  One strand will create a front leg and a back leg.  The legs should be approximately a hook shank in length.  The front legs should be slightly shorter than the back legs.  Finally, whip finish and cut off the tag end of thread.  Apply a dash of head cement to your finishing wraps. 

‘Fly Fish Food’ has a great instructional video on how to tie this fly below:



Clark Pierce and Curtis Fry have also have a great website at / https://www.flyfishfood.com/ .

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com .  

Sunday, December 29, 2019

Paul's January 2020 Fly of the Month

Cross Over Nymph


Hook:  Size #12 to #14 Dohiku 302, Hanak 230, Fasna 210 or 200, Orientsun 7224, or favorite nymph/wet fly barbless hook.
Bead:  (Optional) Copper Tungsten bead or color of choice. 
Tying Thread:   Tan 16/0 Veevus thread . 
Tag:  Orange Glo-Brite #7 Fluorescent Floss.
Tail:  Coq de Leon fibers.
Rib:  Micro Flasabou or Pearlescent Mylar.
Counter-rib:  Thread spun in a loop.
Abdomen:  Nature’s Spirit UV Tracer Squirrel Dubbing Natural Gray.
Hackle:  CDC in natural or similar color.
Thorax:  UV Squirrel Dubbing Natural Fox Squirrel (For contrast to the abdomen).

This fly was developed by fly fisher Devin Olsen, ‘The Tactical Fly Fisher’.  Originally developed without the bead for still water fishing, the river version with a bead is a fish catching magnet.  (Hence the “Cross Over Nymph” because of it’s still water & river adaption.)  The fly designer fished it to imitate callibaetis nymphs, but it’s just an all-round great pattern.  It’s a conglomeration of all those elements to make fish eat it, -- orange tag, UV flash, & CDC hackle. This is really a glorified wet fly even though it’s called a nymph.  There is a segment of fly fishers out there that fish and know how productive ‘wet fly’ fishing can be, then there’s many that don’t.  Case in point, on my first trip out to Montana I was ‘cleaning up’ using a wet fly rig.  Everyone out there was fishing a ‘dropper & a hopper’.   My friends along on the trip didn’t carry any wet flies.  We visited a half dozen fly shops in the Missoula area.  Not one shop sold or had any wet flies on hand.  For that matter, rarely do I see a fly shop here in CT carry any.  So tie them for yourself!   If I were to carry just two wet flies, I’d carry the ‘Partridge & Orange’ and a ‘Hare’s Ear Wet Fly’.   This Hare’s Ear variation, with all it’s strike triggers, just might be the fly for you. 

Begin by placing your bead on the hook and mount it in your vice.  Start your thread immediately behind the bead.  Take a few wraps and cut off the tag end.  Continue to make touching wraps down the hook shank until it lines up with the hook point.  Next, take 3 strands of Orange Glo-Brite Florescent Floss and tie it in behind the eye and wrap back to the bend.  Cut the floss to create a short tag behind the bend of the hook.  Now tie in 4-5 fibers of  Coq de Leon to create your tail.  It should be a little less than a hook shank length behind the fly.  You are now going to tie in your ribs.  Tie in your Micro-Flashabou/mylar on the near side of the hook.  Next, create a loop with your thread (the counter rib) and tie it off, leaving it on the far side of the hook.  You are now going to dub the abdomen/body of the fly with the UV Squirrel dubbing.  Make sure you leave room behind the bead for your thorax.  Next, take your Micro-Fashabou and palmer it forward for your first rib.  About 4 wraps should do it.  Tie that off.  Next, place your hackle pliers at the base of your thread ‘loop’ and give it a few twists.  Now palmer it forward in the opposite direction for your ‘counter wrap’.  Take your CDC feather and trim one side of it off leaving just the tip untrimmed.  Stroke the remaining fibers back with your fingers and tie it in by the tip behind the bead.  Trim the tip off and take 2-3 turns with the feather, stroking the fibers back as you do it.  Tie and clip off the butt end.  Next, add & dub your thorax with your UV Fox Squirrel dubbing.  Tie off the fly with a few wraps behind the bead.  Dab some cement on it and the fly is finished.  If some of the CDC fibers extend beyond the bend of the hook, you can trim them off with your fingers to bring it to length. 

Devin Olsen of the Tactical Fly Fisher has a great instructional video on how to tie this fly below:

He also has a great website at https://www.tacticalflyfisher.com/

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com .  

Wednesday, November 27, 2019

My Favorite Streamers



Every winter I try to set fly fishing goals for the upcoming year.  One year I decided to do more May fishing for American Shad.  Another season, I wanted to improve on some Euro-nymphing.  The last few years I wanted to do more fly fishing with friends (always a goal).  This coming year I want to focus on more streamer fishing.  That will be easy.  I love doing it.  While many fly fishers are tying and fishing larger articulated streamers, I've been tying and fishing smaller patterns.  Just my preference.  Some flies included here are the Yellow Mustache, Barr's Bouface in olive (made with a squirrel zonker),  Reece's Masked Bandit (also with squirrel),  Wood Duck Heron Fly in yellow & orange, and finally one of the best, if not the best, Fly of the Month ever, The Goldie.  Now might be the time for you to set your own personal fly fishing goals for the upcoming season.  It's also time to tie up some flies for the upcoming season.  It certainly helps to pass the time to get you through the winter until the warmer fising months arrive.  You can dream of that 'big one' thats going to fall for the fly in  your vice.  Us Fly Guys are very passionate about our sport.  If we're not fly fishing, we're day dreaming about it.  Set your goals for the year to come, tie up the patterns you need, dream about that trophy fish your going to catch!

Saturday, November 23, 2019

Paul's December 2019 Fly of the Month

McKenna's Rumble Bug



*Special Note – The second picture was taken with a UV light.  You clearly see how vibrant the Glo-Brite Fluorescent Orange thread is.  Also, jig hooks have less shank area than traditional hooks.  A size #16 jig hook is closer to a traditional #18 hook. My preferred size hook for this pattern is a #16 jig hook.

Hook:  Size #14 to #18 barbless jig hook. 
Bead:  Silver slotted Tungsten bead or color of choice.  For a size#16 hook use a 7/64” bead.
Tying Thread:   Orange Glo-Brite Fluorescent thread & Purple Glo-Brite Fluorescent thread . 
Tail:  8-10 Wood duck fibers.
Tag:  Orange Glo-Brite Fluorescent thread.
Body:  A base of Purple Glo-Brite thread with a strand of Pearl Flash-a-bou over wrapped on top of your purple thread.  The Flash-a-bou wraps are then coated with UV Resin.
Collar:  Equal portions of Rainbow Sow Scud Dubbing & Rainbow Senyo Fursion Dub.  

This fly was developed by competition fly fisher Dave McKenna.  It’s kinda’ a cross between a ‘rainbow warrior’ & a ‘lightening bug’.  It works just as well as those two patterns and it’s a euro nymph you definitely want in your box.  It was originally designed to fish the Rumble river in Cherokee North Carolina after it was hit by heavy rains & stained water.

Begin by placing your bead on the hook and mount it in your vice.  Start your Orange Glo-Brite thread immediately behind the bead.  Take a few wraps and cut off the tag end.  Continue to make touching wraps down the hook shank until it lines up with the hook point.  Next, snip off 8-10 wood duck fibers for the tail.  Keep the tips aligned.  Tie in a tail about a hook shank in length.  Your going to wrap a little beyond the hook point when you tie in your tail.  It will become part of your ‘orange tag’.  Wrap your orange thread all the way back up behind the bead.  Whip finish and cut it off.  Now tie in your Purple Glo-Brite thread behind the bead.  Take a few wraps and cut off the tag end.  You’re now going to tie in your strand of Pearl Fash-a-bou.  Continue wrapping down the hook shank leaving a ‘tag end of orange’ at the end of the hook shank.  Bring your thread back up behind the bead.  Make ‘touching’ wraps of the Flash-a-bou over the purple thread and back up behind the hook eye.  Tie and cut off the tag end.   Coat the Flash-a-bou body with a thin layer of UV Resin and cure it with your light.  Next, mix equal amounts of Rainbow Sow Scud dubbing & Rainbow Senyo Fusion Dub. Now dub a slim noodle on your thread and create a short fuzzy collar behind the bead.  You want a minimal collar to ensure that the fly sinks quickly.  Do a 4-5 turn whip finish and your fly is complete. 

Tightlinevideo/Tim Flagler has an excellent instructional video on how to tie this fly below:




If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com .  

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Paul's November 2019 Fly of the Month

Drowned Ant


Hook:  Size #14 to #20 hook.  Diachii 1530 or hook of choice.
Tying thread:   6/0 black, cinnamon brown, or orange thread. 
Body:  Formed by two bumps of thread.  The rear bump slightly larger than the front bump.
Finish:  UV Resin of choice.  Both bumps are coated and cured with UV Resin.
Legs/Hackle:  Black neck hackle.

If you fly fish the Housatonic, or especially if you fish the Farmington, you want to have some ant patterns in your box.  In late August into September, keep on the ‘look out’ for massive ant hatches.  It usually happens right after a rain storm.  Although most fly guys fish floating ant patterns, I love fishing this “Drowned Ant”.  It is a very easy tie, in fact it’s probably the easiest fly to tie that I’ve ever posted.

Start your thread and create a small cylindrical bump behind the eye of the hook.  If you divide the hook into thirds, the front bump will occupy the 1st third of the hook shank.  Next move your thread to the rear third of the fly and create a bump slightly bigger than the front one.  This bump will occupy the rear third of the hook shank.  Tie and clip off your thread.  In between the two bumps there should be a slim layer of thread to be used as a base for your legs/hackle.   Now coat both bumps of the fly with UV Resin.  Cure the resin with your UV light.  Finally, in the middle third of the fly tie in your black hackle for the legs.  Take only one or two wraps.  Tie and clip off your hackle and whip finish your ant. 

I know other ant patterns use dubbing to form the body of the fly.  I like this one because the thread and UV finish has less buoyancy.  The ant sinks better.   Remember, ants come in a few colors.  I tie some black ants, cinnamon brown ants, and orange ants.  I also mix and match colors.  I might tie an ant with a black front bump, and tie the rear of the ant in brown or orange.  My favorite way to fish it is in tandem with a nymph.  The ant is almost always my top fly. 

Jim Misiura has an excellent instructional video on how to tie a drowned ant below:



 One thing he does different than me is apply UV Resin as each segment of the ant is completed.  I find it faster to apply it before tying in my legs.  It also helps to avoid getting resin on my hackle if I apply it  after my ant bumps are completed.


If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com .

Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Paul's October 2019 Fly of the Month

Baker's Hole Bugger


Hook:  Size #6 to #12 steamer hook. 
Tying thread:   Brown, 6/0.
Bead:  Optional, color of choice.
Weight:  Lead or lead free wire.
Tail:  Brown marabou on the bottom; then gold Krystal flash; topped byYellow marabou.
Rib:  Gold Wire. 
Hackle:  Grizzly saddle hackle.
Body:  Yellow/brown variegated chenille sized to match hook size. 

This is a very tried and true wooly bugger pattern.  It was originally developed for ‘Baker’s Hole’ on the Madison River, but like most wooly bugger patterns, it works everywhere.     

Begin by placing your bead on the hook if you want to provide some additional weight.   Another option to weight your fly is to make 6-8 wraps of lead or lead free wire at the midpoint of the hook shank.  If you do so, cover those wraps with your thread.  Next, take a clump of Brown Marabou and tie it in at the hook bend for your tail.  I don’t like to make the tails of my woolly bugger too long.  It should be a hook shank length or less.  When tying in the marabou, I trim it to length so that it rests along the entire hook shank.  This lets me give the bugger a nice even body profile.  (This is a little more difficult to do if you use some lead wraps.  It’s why I prefer to use a bead to add additional weight to my buggers.)  On top of the Brown Marabou tie in six strands of Gold Krystal flash.  Next, tie in a clump of Yellow Marabou with the same technique you used for the Brown Marabou.  Now, tie in your Gold Wire rib.  The rib is going to make your bugger much more durable.  Next, tie in your Grizzly Saddle Hackle.  Now tie in your Variegated Chenille.  Palmer the Chenille forward and tie & trim it off behind the eye or bead.  Now, palmer your hackle forward creating even wraps along the hook shank.  At the eye or behind the bead, give it an extra wrap or two.  Next counter wrap your Rib/wire along the hook shank.  Try not to bind down the hackle fibers.  Tie and trim that off behind the eye (or bead if you used one).  Apply some head cement for durability. 

How to fish this fly – You can swing it like a wet fly.  Also retrieve and strip it at various speeds.  If the water is high, I like to use a sink tip line.

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com .