Thursday, June 4, 2020

Paul's June 2020 Fly of the Month

Paul's Covid Cure


Hook:  Daiichi 1120, or TMC 2457, or TMC 2487 #14 Curved Nymph/Emerger hook.  (I prefer the TMC 2487)
Thread:  Black.
Bead:  Tungsten Rainbow Bead, either 2.4 mm or 2.8 mm.
Body:  Black UTC medium wire.
Rib:  Red UTC small wire.
Finish:  Coat the entire fly with UV resin.

I started tying and fishing this fly this past spring.  Boy has it produced fish.  It’s a very easy and simple fly to tie.  Consisting of only 3 materials – red wire, black wire, and a rainbow bead.   Last fall I fished a wet fly constructed with a black & red wire wrapped down the hook shank with a soft hackle.  I caught a lot of fish on it.  I wanted to continue to fish this red wire/black wire combo in other fly designs and came up with this ‘sort of’ perdigon fly.  I didn’t put a tail on it.  Just wanted to test fish it first and found the fish loved it.  This fly sinks like a rock and really gets down.  Once finished with UV Resin, it’s very iridescent. 

To tie this fly, begin by placing your bead on the hook.  I’ve used both 2.4 & 2.8 mm beads for this pattern.  Tie in your red wire to be used for the rib.  I tie it in behind the bead and wrap down the bend of the hook past the hook point.  Next bring your thread back behind the bead.  Tie in your black wire and wrap down the bend of the hook to where your red wire begins.  With your thread, create a slim tapered body.  Return your thread behind the eye.    With your black wire, make even and tight wraps around the hook shank all the way to the eye.  Tie it off and ‘helicopter’ or trim off the tag end.  Now with your red wire, wrap it up the body in the opposite direction, creating an evenly segmented body.  Tie it off and ‘helicopter’ or trim off the tag end.  Whip finish the fly.  Now apply your favorite UV resin to the fly.  Cure it, and you’re done.

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com

Monday, May 4, 2020

Paul's May 2020 Bonus Fly of the Month

Beck's Super Bugger


Hook:  Size # 6 & #8 Tiemco 3761 or preferred hook.
Colors:  Tan, Black or Olive.
Thread:  Tan, Black or Olive.
Tail:  Tan, Black or Olive Marabou Blood Feather, over which is overlayed 6 strands of Krystal Flash.
Body:  Dyed Grizzly Hen body feathers palmered forward.
Legs:  Two rubber Sili-legs, root beer, black or olive.
Eyes:  Lead eyes painted Yellow and Black, XSmall on Size #8, Small on Size #6.
Head:  Spiked dubbing figure-eighted around the eyes.  Or, use dubbing brush.  (I like to use a dubbing loop of matching Ice Dub)

This fly was developed by fly fisher Cathy Beck.  She designed it to create more underwater vibration.  It also has fantastic movement.  Because the eyes are mounted on top of the hook shank the fly fishes ‘inverted’ and has great jigging action.  It will also prevent your fly from snagging on the bottom.

Begin by placing your hook in the vice.  Start your thread and wrap from the eye back approximately ¼ of the hook shank.  You are now going to tie on your eyes.  I form two little bumps that I mount the eyes between.  They should be two eye lengths back on the hook shank.  Secure the yes by figure eight wraps and apply come head cement or super glue.  Bring your tying thread back to the hook bend.  Tie in 6 strands of Krystal Flash.  It should be approximately the length of the hook shank beyond the bend.  Tie in your marabou tail.  It will be the same length as your Krystal Flash.  Next, tie in the first of  your grizzly hen hackles.  Palmer the hackle forward in the direction of  your eyes.  Keep your wraps tight building your body.  It will take a few feathers to create your body.  End behind your eyes. In front of your eyes, tie in two Sili-legs at their mid point.  Bring your thread behind the eyes and lock them in place there with figure eight wraps.  Make sure the legs are equal in distance on both sides of the hook shank.  Next dub around the head including more figure eight wraps around the eyes.  You can dub the material on the thread, or you can create a dubbing loop (I like to use matching Ice Dub), or use a dubbing brush.  Tie off and whip finish behind the eye.  Apply head cement and your fly is finished. 

There is a great video on how to tie this fly below:



Barry and Cathy Beck have a website & blog at https://www.barryandcathybeck.com/site/index.php/our-blog . 

 If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com . 

Thursday, April 30, 2020

Paul's May 2020 Fly of the Month

Danger Baby


Hook:  Tiemco 2487 Curved Scud Hook. Size #14.
Thread:  Chartreuse UTC 140 Thread for tag.  Black UTC 70 Thread for the remainder of fly.
Bead:  3/32” Gold Tungsten Bead.
Body/Thorax:  2-3 strands of peacock hurl inter-twined with a tag of your tying thread.
Wing: Golden Brown Antron Yarn.

This fly was developed by Theo Bakelaar.   He was the originator of using gold beads in fly tying.  He was the one who brought gold beads to America for fly tying.  This pattern has consistently produced for me.  It works all year long but is extra effective during the Green Caddis hatch on the Housatonic.  It’s very easy to tie and has a minimum amount of materials

To tie this fly, begin by placing your bead on the hook.  Start your Chartreuse thread behind the eye and wrap down to the midway point of the bend.  That’s where you’re going to create your ‘hot spot’.  Wrap back up behind the bead.  Whip finish and cut off your Chartreuse thread.  Start your Black thread behind the eye and wrap down the bend, but leave a Chartreuse ‘tag’ from your previous wraps.  Bring your thread back to the eye.  Tie 2 strands of peacock hurl behind the eye and wrap it down to your tag.  Where your Chartreuse tag ends, create a loop with your thread.  Cut the thread loop to form a single strand.  Twist  your peacock strands and thread together to create a rope.  Bring your thread up the body so that it extends to just beyond the hook point.  Your leaving room for what is usually known as the ‘thorax’ of the fly.  Wrap your peacock rope forward and tie it off.  Don’t cut the peacock rope, just tie it off and leave it so that it extends beyond the bead.  Next, tie in your Antron wing.  The tag end faces towards the back of the fly, the rest will also extend beyond the bead.  Cut off your tag end and take the remaining end of antron and bring it back to create a wing.  Tie it in place.  Now take your remaining peacock rope and wrap the head/thorax in front of the wing.  Tie it off behind the bead with whip finishes.  Apply a drop of head cement and you’re done.

Tightlinesvideo has a great instructional video on this pattern below:


If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com . 

Thursday, April 2, 2020

Paul's April 2020 Fly of the Month

Iso Iso Baby


Iso Iso Baby (Isonychia dry fly)

Hook:  Dai-Riki Size #10, #12, #14 1X long Dry Fly Hook (or hook of preference).
Tying thread:   Black, Brown, or Rust 70 Denier Ultra-Thread.
Tail:  Deer Hair tips from the center of the hide.
Body:  Isonychia dry fly dubbing.
Post:  Deer Hair butt ends from the previously tied tail.
Legs:  Rubber legs tied in Madam X style.
Hackle:  Dunn dry fly hackle sized to the hook.

This pattern is actually a variation and knock off of the Madam X fly.  The Isonychia is a wonderful insect.  It is present on our Connecticut streams from June to October.  And it’s a big fly!  So when most hatches on the Housatonic & Farmington start getting smaller as spring turns to summer, you can still fish this large fly and do quite well, sometimes exceptionally well.

Start your thread behind the eye of the hook.  Leave it two eye lengths behind the eye.  This will be the location for your wing post.  Snip a small clump of deer hair from the hide.  Strip out the fuzzy material from the hair and stack it.  Now measure it on the hook shank to be used for your tail.  It should be a hook gap and ½ in length.  Make two loose wraps of thread at the tie in point.  Now make a tight wrap and wrap your thread rearward.  Try to keep the deer hair on top of the hook shank as you wrap towards the rear.  Now return your thread back to the tie in point and take a couple wraps in front of the butt ends of your deer hair.  The dear hair butts will become your fly post.  Add a drop of adhesive to the bottom of your post and wrap upward to create a post perpendicular to the hook shank.  Next, return your thread to the rear of the fly.  Dub an even body with Iso dubbing.  Leave a small space behind the wing post.  Next, select a Dunn Hackle to match the hook size.  Strip the base fibers from the hackle and tie it in on the near side of the fly.  After it is tied in, raise it so that it is perpendicular to the hook shank and against the wing post.  Wrap it so that is securely bound to it.  Now select your leg material.  Your going to tie it in right behind the post, Madam X style.  The rear legs should extend approximately a half a tail length beyond the bend.  The front legs will have the same proportions.  Next, dub the space behind the post, bring your dubbed thread forward while sweeping back your front legs.  Dub behind the eye.  Position your thread at the base of the tying post.  Start wrapping your hackle down the post, making one wrap under the other.  When you reach the base of the fly, take two thread wraps around the post to secure it.  Now clip the excess hackle.  Make a 4-5 turn whip finish around the post.  Now clip your tying thread.  Trim your wing post.  It should be approximately the same length as your tail.  Add a drop of head cement to the base of the wing post on each side.  Your fly is complete. 

There is a great instructional video by Tightlinevideo below:


If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com .  

Friday, February 28, 2020

Paul's March 2020 Fly of the Month

Nuclear Caddis



Hook:  Size #14 Hanak 333BL or favorite curved nymph hook.
Bead:  Chartreuse Tungsten bead size 7/64’ (3.0mm). 
Tying Thread:   UTC Ultra thread 70 Denier – Fl. Orange . 
Body:  Synthetic quill in Fluorescent Orange, coated with UV Resin.
Wing Case:  Waspi Thin Skin in brown, tan, or black .
Thorax/Collar:  Hareline Peacock Black Ice Dubbing.

This fly is a beacon in the water.  The entire fly is a ‘hot spot’.  I recently fished it in tandem with a buggy and more natural looking nymph.  In doing so I caught my first trout of 2020 on this fly.  For the first time I used an artificial quill.  It creates a very nice segmented body.  Most fly shops & suppliers carry 2 or 3 different types of quills.  Coated with UV Resin, it’s indestructible. 

To tie this fly, begin by placing your bead on your hook.  Please note that there are many new competition style hooks out there.  Sometimes the curve and actual hook size differ.  Even with beads, size and weight can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer.  Just match the bead and hook to reflect how fast and deep you want the fly to sink.  Next, start you hook behind the eye and create a tapered body from the bend of the hook to behind the eye.  Bring your thread back to the bend of the hook and tie in your synthetic quill.  Bring the thread back up behind the bead.  With hackle pliers, palmer your quill forward creating a segmented body.  Leave some room for your wing case and thorax/collar.  Tie it off and cut off the tag end.  Coat the body with your preferred UV resin and cure it with your light.  Next, tie in your thin skin wing case.  Fold it back.  Now dub in your collar of Hareline Peacock Black Ice Dub.  Fold the wing case forward and tie it off behind the bead.  Apply a drop of UV resin on your wing case.  Cure it with your light and your done.

Fly Fisherman and Tier, Raymond Collette, has a great instructional video on how to tie this fly below:



If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com .

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Paul's February 2020 Fly of the Month

The Countach Squirrel Jig Nymph



Hook:  Size #10 Firehole Sticks 516 Jig Hook or favorite nymph barbless jig hook.
Bead:  Gold Tungsten slotted bead size 5/32’ (3.8mm). 
Tying Thread:   UTC Ultra thread 70 Denier – Fl. Orange . 
Tail/Legs:  Grizzly Micro Legs – Root beer.
Rib:  Midge Sparkle Braid – Root beer.
Body/Collar: Natural Furs Dubbing – Fox Squirrel.

This fly comes from the website called ‘Fly Fish Food’, the home site of Clark Piece & Curtis Fry.  It is named after a group of fly fishing friends who called their gathering the “Countach” Fly Fishing Club.  This is another variation of a ‘Hares Ear’/’Squirrel’ dubbed nymph.  What’s important to take from this version is the addition of rubber legs.  I was never a big fan of nymphs with rubber legs, but after fly fishing ‘golden stones’ with them, it changed me forever.  Sometimes the addition of legs is what triggers trout to hit this fly. 

Begin by placing your bead on the hook and mount it in your vice.  Start your thread immediately behind the bead.  Lock your bead into place with your thread.  Bring your thread back to the end of the bend.  Tie in your tail of Micro legs to form a split ‘V’ tail on your nymph.  Next tie in your rib of Root beer Midge Sparkle Braid.  Tie it in behind the bead and wrap back down to your tail.  Next, begin to dub your squirrel body.  You can tie this fly in any color.  Darker colors or black can represent a stone fly.  Dub up to and behind the bead.  Next, counter wrap your rib taking even wraps along the body to give it a segmented look.  Tie and cut the tag end off behind the bead.  Now, make a short dubbing loop.  Your going to build up the dubbing loop with more squirrel.  Twist the dubbing loop & squirrel with your dubbing tool.  It should create a spiky-buggy dubbing brush.  Now wrap that dubbing brush behind the bead.  Usually, 3 wraps will do it.  Tie and clip it off.  Bring your thread back behind the bead.  Give it a couple wraps here.  You are now going to tie on some rubber legs on each side of the hook shank.  One strand will create a front leg and a back leg.  The legs should be approximately a hook shank in length.  The front legs should be slightly shorter than the back legs.  Finally, whip finish and cut off the tag end of thread.  Apply a dash of head cement to your finishing wraps. 

‘Fly Fish Food’ has a great instructional video on how to tie this fly below:



Clark Pierce and Curtis Fry have also have a great website at / https://www.flyfishfood.com/ .

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com .  

Sunday, December 29, 2019

Paul's January 2020 Fly of the Month

Cross Over Nymph


Hook:  Size #12 to #14 Dohiku 302, Hanak 230, Fasna 210 or 200, Orientsun 7224, or favorite nymph/wet fly barbless hook.
Bead:  (Optional) Copper Tungsten bead or color of choice. 
Tying Thread:   Tan 16/0 Veevus thread . 
Tag:  Orange Glo-Brite #7 Fluorescent Floss.
Tail:  Coq de Leon fibers.
Rib:  Micro Flasabou or Pearlescent Mylar.
Counter-rib:  Thread spun in a loop.
Abdomen:  Nature’s Spirit UV Tracer Squirrel Dubbing Natural Gray.
Hackle:  CDC in natural or similar color.
Thorax:  UV Squirrel Dubbing Natural Fox Squirrel (For contrast to the abdomen).

This fly was developed by fly fisher Devin Olsen, ‘The Tactical Fly Fisher’.  Originally developed without the bead for still water fishing, the river version with a bead is a fish catching magnet.  (Hence the “Cross Over Nymph” because of it’s still water & river adaption.)  The fly designer fished it to imitate callibaetis nymphs, but it’s just an all-round great pattern.  It’s a conglomeration of all those elements to make fish eat it, -- orange tag, UV flash, & CDC hackle. This is really a glorified wet fly even though it’s called a nymph.  There is a segment of fly fishers out there that fish and know how productive ‘wet fly’ fishing can be, then there’s many that don’t.  Case in point, on my first trip out to Montana I was ‘cleaning up’ using a wet fly rig.  Everyone out there was fishing a ‘dropper & a hopper’.   My friends along on the trip didn’t carry any wet flies.  We visited a half dozen fly shops in the Missoula area.  Not one shop sold or had any wet flies on hand.  For that matter, rarely do I see a fly shop here in CT carry any.  So tie them for yourself!   If I were to carry just two wet flies, I’d carry the ‘Partridge & Orange’ and a ‘Hare’s Ear Wet Fly’.   This Hare’s Ear variation, with all it’s strike triggers, just might be the fly for you. 

Begin by placing your bead on the hook and mount it in your vice.  Start your thread immediately behind the bead.  Take a few wraps and cut off the tag end.  Continue to make touching wraps down the hook shank until it lines up with the hook point.  Next, take 3 strands of Orange Glo-Brite Florescent Floss and tie it in behind the eye and wrap back to the bend.  Cut the floss to create a short tag behind the bend of the hook.  Now tie in 4-5 fibers of  Coq de Leon to create your tail.  It should be a little less than a hook shank length behind the fly.  You are now going to tie in your ribs.  Tie in your Micro-Flashabou/mylar on the near side of the hook.  Next, create a loop with your thread (the counter rib) and tie it off, leaving it on the far side of the hook.  You are now going to dub the abdomen/body of the fly with the UV Squirrel dubbing.  Make sure you leave room behind the bead for your thorax.  Next, take your Micro-Fashabou and palmer it forward for your first rib.  About 4 wraps should do it.  Tie that off.  Next, place your hackle pliers at the base of your thread ‘loop’ and give it a few twists.  Now palmer it forward in the opposite direction for your ‘counter wrap’.  Take your CDC feather and trim one side of it off leaving just the tip untrimmed.  Stroke the remaining fibers back with your fingers and tie it in by the tip behind the bead.  Trim the tip off and take 2-3 turns with the feather, stroking the fibers back as you do it.  Tie and clip off the butt end.  Next, add & dub your thorax with your UV Fox Squirrel dubbing.  Tie off the fly with a few wraps behind the bead.  Dab some cement on it and the fly is finished.  If some of the CDC fibers extend beyond the bend of the hook, you can trim them off with your fingers to bring it to length. 

Devin Olsen of the Tactical Fly Fisher has a great instructional video on how to tie this fly below:

He also has a great website at https://www.tacticalflyfisher.com/

If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or at pdinice@frontier.com .