Friday, December 26, 2014

Paul's January 2015 Fly of the Month

Peacock Bugger

 
 
 
 
Hook:  3x or 4x streamer hook.  This bugger can be tied in Sizes #6-#10.  By far the most productive size for me has been in a Size #10.  Great small bugger on small and big waters.
Tying thread:   Olive or brown thread.
Head:  Black or gold bead to match hook.  I tend to do better with a black bead.
Tail:  Black marabou flanked with two pieces of Peacock Krystal Flash.
Body:  4-5 strands of peacock hurl twisted around a thread tag to form a dubbing rope. 
Rib (optional):  Peacock Krystal Flash.
Hackle:  Black saddle hackle.
Every once in a while I’ll have to highlight a Wooly Bugger as a Fly of the Month.  It is just one of the best trout flies ever created.  On occasion I’ve also repeated a Fly of the Month because it’s been super productive.  That’s happened 3-4 times over the 30 years that I’ve been doing this.  This is the only time a pattern has appeared as the FOTM 3 times.  Why?  Well it is one of my top 5 “go to” flies.  It is deadly on small streams and big rivers.  When I was an inexperienced fly fisherman, it was one of the first flies that caught fish after fish for me.  It works all year long if you fish it in a small size.  
Begin by placing your bead head on the hook.  Start your thread behind the bead and layer it to the bend of the hook.  Tie in your marabou tail.  It should not be longer than the hook shank length.  One of the things I like about the small size of this bugger is a lot of “short strikes” are avoided.  Next flank the marabou with two strands of peacock krystal flash. (Option:  If you want to rib your fly do not clip/save 1 tag end of the krystal flash and palmer it later.)  Now tie in your saddle hackle by the tip. Next, tie in 3-5 strands of peacock hurl.  Create a tag end of the thread similar to how you would create a dubbing loop.  Advance your thread up to the bead.  Twist the thread and strands of peacock hurl into a rope.  The thread will provide extra durability for your fly.  Palmer your “rope” forward along the hook shank, creating an even body.  Tie it off.  Next, palmer your hackle forward in the opposite direction.  Give it additional wraps before the bead to create a collar on the fly.  Tie it off and apply head cement to the final wraps. Your done!  The peacock bugger can be fished with nymph, wet fly, or streamer techniques. 
This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at  www.hffa.net and www.tightlinesflyfishing.blogspot.com .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .
 

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Paul's December 2014 Fly of the Month

Euro Jig Pheasant Tail


 
 
Hook:  Jig Hook Size #10-#18.  I use Allen Fly Fishing J100 BL hooks.
Tying thread:   UTC 70 denier Black or brown.
Bead:  Black tungsten bead.
Tail:  Cul de leon feather fibers.
Abdomen:  Pheasant Tail fibers.
Rib:   Copper Ultra-wire ‘brassie’ sized wire.
Hot Spot:  UV Hot Orange or Hot Pink Ice Dub.
Thorax:  Natures Spirit Emergence Dubbing.
This has quickly become one of my “go to” nymphs.  With regard to jig hooks, I’ve never seen anything like them in terms of how fast they get down in the water column.  Most importantly, they catch fish.  I use Allen J100BL jig hooks.  They are black and barbless.  Be aware that the shank on a jig hook runs smaller than a traditional nymph hook.  I tie most of mine on a Size #10 hook.  In reality it results in a Size #12 or #14 nymph.
Begin by placing your black tungsten bead on the hook.  Some tyers use “slotted beads” when tying on a jig hook.  I haven’t had any problem using a traditional bead.  Next begin your thread behind the bead and wind down to the bend in the hook.  Tie in your Cul de leon fibers to create a tail.  The tail should be approximately the length of the hook shank.  Next, tie in your copper wire for a rib.  Now tie in 5-6 pheasant tail fibers by the tips.  Starting at the hook bend wrap the fibers forward just as you would a traditional pheasant tail nymph.  Tie off making sure you have left in enough room for your “hot spot” and thorax.  Next, dub your hot spot.  It should be approximately two (2) wraps around the hook shank.  For the rest of the thorax or collar you are going to use a different tying technique.  Take small clumps of dubbing and tie them in behind the bead.  Stroke the fibers back to create a veil or collar similar to that of a hackled wet fly.  An alternative to this method is to use a dubbing loop and make a couple wraps right behind the bead.  Remember to stoke the fibers back.  Tie off your fly and apply some head cement to the end wraps. 

A gentleman by the name of Hans Stephenson has a great instructional video on how to tie this pattern.

 
 If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month, I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .  This pattern can also be viewed at www.hffa.net .

 
 

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Fall Fly Fishing with Friends 2014


As I get older the most important part of fishing isn't catching fish.  It's the sharing of experiences with good friends.  I hope to fish with some of you in the near future.  Paul

Paul's November 2014 Fly of the Month

Small Fry  -  A great "cross over" fly.



Small Fry Salt Water Version

Hook:  Mustad 34077 or similar – size to match forage fish (Pictured is tied on Size 4 hook).

Thread:  Mono, 3/0 thread, flat waxed nylon, or Fly Master Plus, with color to match wing.

Belly(underwing):  White buck tail.

Flash:  A few strands of holographic tinsel and pearl flash. 

Wing:  Sparse layer of pink buck tail topped by a heavier layer of olive buck tail.

Eyes:  3 D adhesive eyes.

Epoxy or Resin:  Cover eyes and half of the body with 5 minute epoxy or “light curing” resin.



Small Fry Salt Water “Jig” Version

Hook:  Mustad 34184 or similar – size to match forage fish (Pictured is tied on Size 1/0 hook).

Thread:  Mono, 3/0 thread, flat waxed nylon, or Fly Master Plus, with color to match wing.

Weight:  Lead (.035 - approximately 10 wraps) on 1/3 of the hook shank closest to the bend before the eye.

Belly(underwing):  White buck tail.

Flash:  A few strands of holographic tinsel and pearl flash. 

Wing:  Sparse layer of pink buck tail topped by a heavier layer of olive buck tail.

Eyes:  3 D adhesive eyes.

Epoxy or Resin:  Cover eyes and half of the body with 5 minute epoxy or “light curing” resin.



Small Fry Fresh Water Streamer

Hook:  Diachi 2220 4x long hook or similar – size to match forage fish (Pictured is tied on Size 6 hook).

Thread:  Mono, 3/0 thread, flat waxed nylon, or Fly Master Plus, with color to match wing.

Belly(underwing):  White buck tail.

Flash:  A few strands of holographic tinsel and pearl flash. 

Wing:  Sparse layer of pink buck tail topped by a heavier layer of olive buck tail.

Eyes:  3 D adhesive eyes.

Epoxy or Resin:  Cover eyes and half of the body with 5 minute epoxy or “light curing” resin.

 
There are 3 different flies here with a basic pattern recipe.  All work great.  I started tying this fly after seeing friends from CT/RI Fly Fishers fishing it in the salt.  Not only is this a great fly to imitate small bait fish, it’s also a great fresh water streamer. I’ve caught some nice trout on it.  I also experimented with it by tying it larger and heavier on a jig hook and did well on that.  In the salt I fish it with slow small twitches, especially when I get close to the end of my retrieve. 
Begin by covering the first 3rd of the hook shank (near the eye of the hook) with thread. 
Jig Fly - If you’re tying the jig fly remember that you will be tying this pattern on an inverted hook.  The fly is going to ride upside down similar to a clouser minnow. You also must cover the thread with wrapped lead. 
Next, tie in your white buck tail belly.  On the small salt water fly, and the trout streamer, the belly is tied in sparse.  Now it’s time to tie in your wing.  Tie in a few strands of holographic tinsel and pearl flash.  Not much is needed.  Next, tie in a sparse layer of pink buck tail.  On top of that is a heavier clump of olive buck tail.  Form a head with tying thread.  Tie and clip off the thread.  Add your 3 D adhesive eyes.  Coat the eyes and body from the eye of the hook to half way down the hook shank. 
This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at  www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .

Monday, September 22, 2014

Paul's October 2014 Fly of the Month

Missing Link Caddis

 
Hook:  Size #15-#17 Tiemco 102Y. 
Tying thread:   Uni-Thread 8/0 in camel.
Abdomen:  Thread.
Rib:   Single strand of pearl Flasabou or Krystal Flash.
Abdomen Coating:  Softex, Flexcement, or Hard As Nails.
Dubbing Ball:  Peacock Ice Dub.
Downwings:  Dun Z-lon.
Upwing:  Elk or coastal deer hair with dark tips.
Hackle:  Blue dun saddle hackle.
 
This pattern has a few more extra steps and ingredients than most caddis dry flies.  It’s well worth the effort to catch finicky trout.  The first thing you’ll notice about this fly is that it’s tied on a Tiemco 102Y hook.   This is a barbless, black, and odd # sized hook.  It’s easy to find and readily available.  Also, this fly has swept back wings and hackle around the deer hair wing.  The fly floats like a cork.  The swept back wings mimic dead or dying caddis on the water.  Everything about this fly is a little different from the norm.  That’s good when fishing TMA’s.  Trout get more finicky as a hatch goes on.  At times you have to toss something different at them.
Begin by starting your thread 1/3 down the hook shank and cover the hook shank half way into the bend of the hook.  Tie in your strand of Krystal Flash and rib the thread body you’ve created.  Tie and trim off your rib.   At the end of the body dub a little ball of Peacock Ice Dub.  In front of it tie in a sparse wing of dun z-lon.  The wing should flare in two segments sweeping back towards the end of the hook.  Clip the wings so that they are the length of the hook bend.  Tie in your Elk or Coastal Deer hair wing just as you would for most caddis imitations.  Tie in your dun saddle hackle.  Wrap the hackle “parachute style” around the elk/deer hair wing including the butts.  Your wing and butts will become elevated and have a higher profile.  You can now trim the butts of the hair wing.  Be careful not to trim any hackle.  Whip finish the fly and you’re done.
A video of how to tie the Missing Link Caddis can be found below.
If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month, I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .  This pattern can also be viewed at www.hffa.net .
 

Monday, August 25, 2014

Paul's September 2014 Fly of the Month

Torrey's Bead Head Hares Ear Caddis
 


Hook:  Tiemco 2487  or Scud hook of choice Size #12-#18. 
Tying thread:   Black or brown.

Bead:  Copper colored tungsten bead.

Abdomen/Body:  70% Hare’s Ear (sheared from mask), mixed with 10% gray squirrel, mixed with 10% Hare’s Ear Antron dubbing, and mixed with 10% assorted Ice Dub/Prism Dub (browns, tan, gray, olive-brown).  I use a coffee grinder to mix all my dubbing together.

Rib:   Copper Ultra-wire ‘brassie’ sized wire.

Weight:  .015 lead wire (approximately 8 wraps).
Collar:  Hare’s ear Prism/Ice Dub.
This fly is from Torrey Collins of Housatonic River Outfitters.  Torrey is one of the best and most knowledgeable nymph fishermen I know.  He is extremely open in sharing what’s happening on the river.  Stop in and see him at HRO or visit HRO on-line at http://dryflies.com/ . 
Begin by placing you bead on the hook.  Immediately behind the bead wrap your lead wire.  Move it right behind the bead to hold it in place.  Form a tapered body with your thread ending with your thread approximately half way down the hook bend.   Tie in your copper wire rib.  Next dub a body leaving a tiny bit of space behind the bead.  Palmer and rib the fly.  Tie off the rib.  Next dub a collar of Hare’s Ear Prism Dub behind the bead.  Apply some cement to the thread and finish your fly with a couple of half hitches.  Finally, and perhaps the most important step in the tying process, brush the collar/fly with Velcro so that a fly is enveloped in a hazy veil. 

Below is Torrey's instructional video on how to tie this fly.


This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at  www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .



Thursday, May 22, 2014

Fly Fishing the Cape


Sometimes using two flies can be a more productive way of fishing.  It's also a lot of fun when there are schoolies around.  I probably shouldn't have used two flies in this instance.  Catching bigger fish with two flies can be an invitation to breaking your rod.  I had a blast though.  Best part though was fishing with friends.  I've had some wonderful experiences over the years!







Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Paul's June 2014 Fly of the Month

Improved Clouser Minnow




Hook:  Mustad 34077 or similar – size to match forage fish.

Thread:  Mono, 3/0 thread, flat waxed nylon, or Fly Master Plus, with color to match wing.

Eyes:  Dumbells – red with black eyes or white with black eyes.

Belly:  Pearl Bill’s Body Braid or Diamond Braid.

Wing:  Pearl crystal flash (or flash material of choice) and bucktail – color of choice).

 
Without a doubt this is one of the most productive flies ever developed.  This is the third time the Clouser Minnow has appeared as a Fly of the Month.  I previously did a traditional tie of the Clouser Minnow.  I also wrote up the “Bendback” Clouser Minnow.    

You may not agree that this is an “improved” Clouser variation.  My friends and I tie it this way and we catch more fish with it.  Why do we catch more fish with it?  When tying the traditional version of this fly, the body or lower wing is tied along the hook shank and protrudes past the bend of the hook.  Ultimately that lower wing is going to foul around the hook bend.  Obviously, the “Improved Clouser” will not.  The more time your fly is fished correctly in the water the more fish you’ll catch.  It will also have added action and sink quickly.
 
Begin by starting your thread at the eye of the hook.  Wrap down to the bend and tie in your body or diamond braid.  Next affix your dumbbell eyes.  Make sure you leave enough room in front of the eyes to tie in your top wing.  I tie my eyes in by creating two bumps on the top of the hook shank and locating the dumbbell between them.  Wrap on each side of the dumbbell eyes and also figure eight wrap under them.  You may want to apply some glue. I prefer to lock them in with some epoxy.  Next apply some cement or crazy glue to the thread wrapped hook shank and bring your thread to the front of the eyes.  Wrap your braid forward to create the body of the fly.  Then, cross wrap over the eyes and tie off the braid in front of them.  Invert the fly so the eyes are on the bottom of the hook.  Begin your wing by tying in your bucktail wing.  Use colors or color of choice. Next, top the wing with your flash material of choice. Finally create a head with your thread and tie off/whip finish the fly.  Apply epoxy or head cement to the head.  This fly bounces on the bottom and you want to make it as durable as you can. 

Vary your retrieves, dead drift it in currents, it all works! 

This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at  www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .

 

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Lower Housatonic Fishing Report April 29, 2014



Hi All, I fished at the mouth of the River after work yesterday.  What beautiful day and afternoon.  The fish co-operated too.  We landed a ton of fish.  The two biggest got away of course, one almost to hand, right around 30”.  The biggest I landed was a chunky 26”er. I had the honor of fishing with internet Fishing Star Bear Cochrane and CT/RI’s own John Potter.  Also present Wayne Gustafson of the HFFA.   Everyone was into fish.  One of the best days of the year so far.tight lines.  Paul

Friday, April 18, 2014

Paul's May 2014 Fly of the Month

Iced Cases Caddis



Hook:  Daiichi 1550 or nymph hook of choice Size #12-#18. 


Tying thread:   Uni 8/0 in olive.
Bead:  Black tungsten bead to match the size of the hook.
Abdomen:  Peacock Ice Dub.  
Rib:   Small copper wire. 
Thorax:  Insect green Superfine Dubbing – or insect green/chartreuse Ice Dub – or my favorite, chartreuse Sea Dragon Dubbing (This dubbing has tiny bug legs mixed in with it.  It’s available at flytyersdungeon.com)
 
This is a very productive pattern and it really sinks and gets down in the water column.    It’s supposed to represent a cased caddis but I think it’s also a great “attractor” type fly with the peacock dubbing and insect green/chartreuse hot spot.
 
Begin by starting your thread at the eye of the hook and wrap back to the bend.  Tie in your copper wire rib.  Dub your body of Peacock Ice Dub.  Leave enough room to dub your thorax.  Wrap your copper rib forward and tie it off and cut the tag end.  Dub your insect green/chartreuse thorax.  Apply some head cement to your thread and whip finish the fly.  Pick out your thorax a bit. You’re done.  How simple is that. 
 
If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of the Month, I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .  This pattern can also be viewed at www.hffa.net .




Sunday, March 23, 2014

Paul's April 2014 Fly of the Month

The Trickster

 
 

 
 
Hook:  Owner 5311-133 Red Finish 3/0 or Mustad 34007ss 4/0
Thread:  Monofilament, fine.
Eyes:  Chartreuse Bead Chain, Medium.
Body:  Rainbow Flash-a-bou under white super hair, under SF Shrimp Flash Blend, under SF Olive Flash Blend, under 5-6 strands of peacock herl.  (This is also a great pattern tied and fished in Black!)
Head:  X-cut Magnum Bunny, Olive Green.
Glue:  Crazy Glue or Zap-a-Gap
This fly was developed by Captain Skip Montello of North Coast Angler.  It’s used to catch finicky stripers on the Joppa Flats.  The Joppa Flats are part of the Merrimack River Estuary System in Newburyport MA.  North Coast Angler has a great website at  http://northcoastangler.com/ .  This is a big fish fly.  I call it “A Bunny Fly on Steroids”.  
This fly is tied with Steve Farrar Flash Blend material.  It’s a mixture of two great fly tying materials, Slinky       Fiber and Angel Hair.  Begin by laying a base of thread from the eye of the hook to the bend.  Next tie the Rainbow Flash-a-bou.  It should extend approximately 1” to 1 ½” beyond the hook bend.  On top of the Flash-a-bou tie in a clump of white super hair.  It should extend 2-3” beyond the hook bend.  You can now tie in your Chartreuse Bead chain eyes very close to the hook eye.  Use figure eight wraps and apply some glue or zap-a-gap to them.  Next tie in your SF Shrimp Flash Blend.  It should extend 4”-5” beyond the hook bend.  Next tie in your SF Olive Blend a little bit longer than the Shrimp.  Next, top this with 8-10 strands of peacock herl.  Finally, tie in your X-cut bunny near the bend of the hook.  You are going to wrap it forward just like a traditional bunny fly.  Tie it off right behind the eyes.  Tie in a clump of red ultra-hair under the eyes to mimic gill plates.  Tie off the fly at the eye, apply head cement, and your done.  Tie this in black and chartreuse as well.  
This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at  www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .  Below is an instructional Fly Tying Video on how to tie the Trickster.
 

 
 

Sunday, February 23, 2014

Paul's March 2014 Fly of the Month

Irresistible Griffiths Gnat

 
 
Flies tied by Friend Will Stone
 
Hook:  Size #10-#16 Dry Fly hook.
Tying thread:   Black 6/0.
Body:  Spun Black Deerhair.
Hackle:  Grizzly Hackle.
 
This Fly of the Month was submitted and tied by HFFA member Will Stone.  If you know Will, you know that his passion for the quiet sport is hard to match.  

 
This particular pattern originates from a fisherman by the name of Kyle Andes.  Kyle is the creator of a great website called “Hammer Creek Fly Fishing”.  It’s based upon his love of fly fishing, fly patterns, and experiences.  It’s also dedicated to a small stream in PA that he grew up fishing on known as ‘Hammer Creek’.  You can check his website out at www.hammercreekflyfishing.com .  Kyle likes to use this fly and drift a nymph below it. 

 
Begin by laying a base of thread from the eye of the hook to the bend.  Tie in your hackle by the butt end.  Size it just like you would a standard dry fly.  Next begin spinning clumps of fine deer hair on the hook shank.  Spinning deer hair isn’t any more difficult than any other tying technique.  It just takes practice.  Cut a clump of deer hair close to the hide.  Comb out and discard the fuzzy material between the hairs.  Cut off the tips and take two loose wraps around the clump of deer hair and the hook shank.   Torque down on the third wrap and spin the hair around the shank of the hook.  Dislodge any rogue hairs that may have gotten stuck on or near the hook point.  Continue this process until you reach the eye of the hook, compressing the hairs tight together with your finger nails as you go.  You will also be winding your thread through the spun hair to advance it.  Now it’s time to trim the spun deer hair. With a sharp pair of scissors trim the deer hair so that it resembles a cigar shaped cylinder.  Next, palmer your hackle evenly along the hook shank and tie it off at the eye.  Whip finish your fly. 

 
This fly and Kyle’s instructional video on how to tie it can be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at  www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net .  Below is Kyle's instructional video on how to tie this fly.
 
 



Saturday, February 8, 2014

HFFA Fly Fishing Expo

 HFFA FLY FISHING & TYING EXPO

MARCH 1, 2014 TIME 10:00 AM TO 3:30 PM

****** $1 Donation******

Where:  St. Paul’s Episcopal Church
65 N. Main St.,  WALLINGFORD, CT.
(Go to ww.hffa.net  for directions)
FLY FISHING & TYING ACTIVITIES
Salt Water Tying Class 
10:30 a.m. start time.  Learn to tie 2 Salt water flies.  Bear’s Bunker, & Modified Clouser Minnow.  Cost is $1.  All materials and hooks provided.  Seating is limited contact Paul at the # or email below.
 HFFA Members will be on-hand to tie many of the best patterns used on the upper and lower Hous.  Your welcome to bring your vice and tie with them.
 TYING & CASTING DEMONSTRATIONS
CASTING DEMONSTRATIONS & LESSONS! (weather permitting)
FLY TYING DEMONSTRATIONS !
 TYING MATERIALS PROVIDED FREE !
TIE YOUR FIRST SALT OR FRESH WATER FLY !
TIE THAT FLY PATTERN YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO LEARN !
 SOME OF THE BEST TYERS AND FISHERMEN IN THE STATE WILL BE IN ATTENDANCE TO ANSWER ANY ?’S YOU MIGHT HAVE !
For more info call Paul Dinice at 203 305-3850 or email at pdinice@snet.net .
Bring your old gear to sell and swap !
 
VENDORS, GUIDES & HOUSATONIC FLY FISHING EXPERTS   There will be a lot of unique materials offered by vendors at the Expo that aren’t normally available anywhere else !


Paul's February 2014 Fly of the Month

Thin Mint Wooly Bugger

 

 

Hook:  3x or 4x streamer hook Size #4-#10
 
Tying thread:   Mono or 6/0 Thread.
 
Head:  Gold cone to match hook.
 
Weight:   Medium lead wire.
 
Tail:  Black marabou over brown marabou over olive marabou. Tail feathers are flanked with two thin pieces of Pearl Flashabou or tinsel.
 
Body:  Peacock Ice Dub. 
 
Rib:  Pearl Flashabou or tinsel; and mono thread (fine wire can be substituted for the mono thread-it’s what I prefer making the fly more durable)
 
Hackle:  Furnace saddle hackle.
 
Usually every couple of years I choose a Wooly Bugger as a Fly of the Month.  Buggers are a trout killer.  This one is no exception.  It is also very similar to a Bugger pattern that I posted about twenty years ago called “The Multibugger”.  Fellow HFFA member Will Stone turned me on to this fly after catching a nice brown on the Farmington River this past winter. 
 
Begin by placing your gold cone head on the hook.  Take your lead wire and make 6-8 turns of it on the hook shank.  Slide it right behind the cone head to lock and center it on the hook.  Cover it with thread and cement over the wraps.  Bring your thread down to the bend of the hook and tie in your tail of black marabou over brown marabou over olive marabou.  Place a couple of thin strands of pearl flashabou on each side of the tail.  Leave a long tag end on one of the strands to be used later as a rib.  Also tie in a piece of mono thread or fine wire to also be used as a counter wrap rib.  Next, dub a body of Peacock Ice Dub from the bend of the hook to the cone head.  Rib the body with the tag end strand of Pearl flashabou.  Tie off the rib and tie in your furnace saddle hackle behind the cone head.  Palmer the hackle, first creating a light collar adjacent to the cone head, then wrap it back to the tail.  Your tag thread will still be behind the cone head.  Use the tag end of the mono thread (or fine wire), and counter wrap it forward though the hackle.  Tie it off at the cone head.  Apply some head cement and the fly is finished. 
 
This fly can also be viewed at the Housatonic Fly Fishermen’s Association website at  www.hffa.net .  If you have any questions about this fly or would like to submit a Fly of The Month I can be reached at 203 305-3850 or e-mail me at pdinice@snet.net